Woodhill Pediatric Associates

Woodhill Pediatric Associates

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👨‍🔬Your healthcare providers and staff at Woodhill Pediatrics are actively monitoring the coronavirus situation.
We are here for our patients and we are following the AAP guidelines. We will continue to see patients for well-child checks, follow-ups and newborn checks, however, these appointments will be conducted only through Isolation #1 side of our office to limit any exposure. We have closed our waiting room at this time. You will need to call upon arrival from parking lot and we will guide your directly to your room
We are beginning to ask more screening questions when you call the office as a preventative measure to protect all our patients.

If you experience typical respiratory illness symptoms such as fever, cough, muscle aches, and fatigue and if you have you been directly exposed to anyone that has tested positive for COVID-19 or traveled in the past 14 days to an affected area such as China, Italy, Iran, Japan, South Korea, Washington State or Northern California, please CALL OUR OFFICE FIRST FOR ADVICE AND GUIDANCE.

As always, some of the best things you can do to prevent the spread of respiratory illnesses are:

Wash your hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds
Avoid close contact with people who are sick
Avoid touching your eyes, nose, and mouth with unwashed hands
After calling our office, follow doctors orders and stay at home if you are sick
My 26 yr old and 22 yr saw Dr. Gray as babies!! Love this practice!!
Looking for a new pediatrician and wondering if y'all had any pictures of the waiting room, rooms, etc..
October good time to protect kids with flu shot !
At Wood hill park kick it

Our goal is to work with parents to bring you the most up-to-date medical care while ensuring the emotional and physical health of your children.

Our practice has a history of over 25 yrs experience from our bilingual nursing staff and providers.

Operating as usual

COVID-19 Vaccines in Children and Adolescents 08/04/2021

COVID-19 Vaccines in Children and Adolescents

https://pediatrics.aappublications.org/content/148/2/e2021052336

COVID-19 Vaccines in Children and Adolescents * Abbreviations: AAP — : American Academy of Pediatrics CDC — : Centers for Disease Control and Prevention COVID-19 — : coronavirus disease 2019 Vaccines are safe and effective in protecting individuals and populations against infectious diseases. New vaccines are evaluated by a long-standing,...

08/18/2020

Woodhill Pediatric Associates's cover photo

08/18/2020

Woodhill Pediatric Associates's cover photo

07/27/2020

COVID-19 Planning Considerations: Guidance for School Re-entry

services.aap.org The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) supports collaborative decision-making among school districts and local and state public health departments about when it is safe to open schools.

07/24/2020

What beach do you travel to most often? 

[06/23/20]   Where do you like to vacation with the kids?

04/15/2020
cdc.gov 03/25/2020

Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19)

Good news for parents. We are open! Please call with any questions or to schedule any appointments needed. Let's keep them as healthy as possible!

cdc.gov Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is a virus (more specifically, a coronavirus) identified as the cause of an outbreak of respiratory illness first detected in Wuhan, China.

wired.com 03/25/2020

Most Kids Only Get Mildly Sick From Covid-19—but Not All

most-kids-only-get-mildly-sick-from-covid-19

wired.com New studies suggest that children still fare better than adults. But babies, toddlers, and kids with other conditions remain at risk.

[03/23/20]   👨‍🔬Your healthcare providers and staff at Woodhill Pediatrics are actively monitoring the coronavirus situation. We are here for our patients and we are following the AAP guidelines. We will continue to see patients for well-child checks, follow-ups and newborn checks, however, these appointments will be conducted only through Isolation 1 side of our office to limit any exposure. We have closed our waiting room at this time. You will need to call upon arrival from the parking lot and we will guide you directly to your room.

We are beginning to ask more screening questions when you call the office as a preventative measure to protect all our patients.
If you experience typical respiratory illness symptoms such as fever, cough, muscle aches, and fatigue and if you have been directly exposed to anyone that has tested positive for COVID-19 or traveled in the past 14 days to an affected area such as China, Italy, Iran, Japan, South Korea, Washington State or Northern California, please CALL OUR OFFICE FIRST FOR ADVICE AND GUIDANCE.

As always, some of the best things you can do to prevent the spread of respiratory illnesses are:

Wash your hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds
Avoid close contact with people who are sick
Avoid touching your eyes, nose, and mouth with unwashed hands
After calling our office, follow doctors orders and stay at home if you are sick

02/12/2020

Safe Kids Worldwide

Have an eager little chef who wants to help in the kitchen? Be sure to review this cooking safety checklist to make sure they are safe.

https://www.safekids.org/tip/cooking-safety-parent-checklist

02/05/2020

Some of our own!

02/05/2020

We Love Christmas Party Time!

02/05/2020

We Love our Babies

12/21/2018

Waltham Public Library

The Waltham News Tribune covered the top books checked out in Waltham this year as well as the top picks by members of our staff: http://waltham.wickedlocal.com/news/20181218/read-on-2018-waltham-public-librarys-top-books-of-year

09/20/2018

Dr Gray with his new patient! So Precious!

healthychildren.org 09/07/2017

Parent-Teen Driving Agreement

Back to School Tips
8/10/2017

The following health and safety tips are from the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP). Feel free to excerpt these tips or use them in their entirety in any print or broadcast story, with acknowledgment of source.

MAKING THE FIRST DAY EASIER
Parents should remember that they need not wait until the first day of class to ask for help. Schools are open to address any concerns a parent or child might have, including the specific needs of a child, over the summer. The best time to get help might be one to two weeks before school opens.
Many children become nervous about new situations, including changing to a new school, classroom or teacher. This may occur at any age. If your child seems nervous, it can be helpful to rehearse entry into the new situation. Take them to visit the new school or classroom before the first day of school. Remind them that there are probably a lot of students who are uneasy about the first day of school. Teachers know that students are nervous and will make an extra effort to make sure everyone feels as comfortable as possible. If your child seems nervous, ask them what they are worried about and help them problem solve ways to master the new situation.
Point out the positive aspects of starting school to create positive anticipation about the first day of class. They will see old friends and meet new ones. Talk with them about positive experiences they may have had in the past at school or with other groups of children.
Find another child in the neighborhood with whom your child can walk to school or ride on the bus.
If it is a new school for your child, attend any available orientations and take an opportunity to tour the school before the first day. Bring the child to school a few days prior to class to play on the playground and get comfortable in the new environment.
If you feel it is needed, drive your child (or walk with her) to school and pick her up on the first day, and get there early on the first day to cut down on unnecessary stress.
Make sure to touch base with your child's new teacher at the beginning or end of the day so the teacher knows how much you want to be supportive of your child's school experience.
Consider starting your child on their school sleep/wake schedule a week or so ahead of time so that time change is not a factor on their first couple of days at school.
BACKPACK SAFETY
Choose a backpack with wide, padded shoulder straps and a padded back.
Pack light. Organize the backpack to use all of its compartments. Pack heavier items closest to the center of the back. The backpack should never weigh more than 10 to 20 percent of your child's body weight. Go through the pack with your child weekly, and remove unneeded items to keep it light.
Remind your child to always use both shoulder straps. Slinging a backpack over one shoulder can strain muscles.
Adjust the pack so that the bottom sits at your child's waist.
If your school allows, consider a rolling backpack. This type of backpack may be a good choice for students who must tote a heavy load. Remember that rolling backpacks still must be carried up stairs, they may be difficult to roll in snow, and they may not fit in some lockers. And review backpack safety with your child.
TRAVELING TO AND FROM SCHOOL

Review the basic rules with your student and practice any new routes or modes of transportation:

School Bus
Children should always board and exit the bus at locations that provide safe access to the bus or to the school building.
Remind your child to wait for the bus to stop before approaching it from the curb.
Make sure your child walks where she can see the bus driver (which means the driver will be able to see her, too).
Remind your student to look both ways to see that no other traffic is coming before crossing the street, just in case traffic does not stop as required. Encourage your child to actually practice how to cross the street several times prior to the first day of school.
Your child should not move around on the bus.
If your child's school bus has lap/shoulder seat belts, make sure your child uses one at all times when in the bus. (If your child's school bus does not have lap/shoulder belts, encourage the school system to buy or lease buses with lap/shoulder belts).
Check on the school's policy regarding food on the bus. Eating on the bus can present a problem for students with allergy and also lead to infestations of insects and vermin on the vehicles.
If your child has a chronic condition that could result in an emergency on the bus, make sure you work with the school nurse or other school health personnel to have a bus emergency plan, if possibly, prior to the first day of class
Car
All passengers should wear a seat belt or use an age- and size-appropriate car safety seat or booster seat.
Your child should ride in a car safety seat with a harness as long as possible and then ride in a belt-positioning booster seat. Your child is ready for a booster seat when she has reached the top weight or height allowed for her seat, her shoulders are above the top harness slots, or her ears have reached the top of the seat.
Your child should ride in a belt-positioning booster seat until the vehicle's seat belt fits properly (usually when the child reaches about 4' 9" in height and is between 8 to 12 years of age). This means that the child is tall enough to sit against the vehicle seat back with her legs bent at the knees and feet hanging down and the shoulder belt lies across the middle of the chest and shoulder, not the neck or throat; the lap belt is low and snug across the thighs, not the stomach.
All children younger than 13 years of age should ride in the rear seat of vehicles. If you must drive more children than can fit in the rear seat (when carpooling, for example), move the front-seat passenger's seat as far back as possible and have the child ride in a booster seat if the seat belts do not fit properly without it.
Remember that many crashes occur while novice teen drivers are going to and from school. You should require seat belt use, limit the number of teen passengers, and do not allow eating, drinking, cell phone conversations even when using hands-free devices or speakerphone, texting or other mobile device use to prevent driver distraction. Familiarize yourself with your state's graduated driver's license law and consider the use of a parent-teen driver agreement to facilitate the early driving learning process. For a sample parent-teen driver agreement, see www.healthychildren.org/teendriver
Bike
Practice the bike route to school before the first day of school to make sure your child can manage it.
Always wear a bicycle helmet, no matter how short or long the ride.
Ride on the right, in the same direction as auto traffic and ride in bike lanes if they are present.
Use appropriate hand signals.
Respect traffic lights and stop signs.
Wear bright-colored clothing to increase visibility. White or light-colored clothing and reflective gear is especially important after dark.
Know the "rules of the road."
Walking to School
Children are generally ready to start walking to school at 9 to 11 years of age.
Make sure your child's walk to school is a safe route with well-trained adult crossing guards at every intersection.
Identify other children in the neighborhood with whom your child can walk to school. In neighborhoods with higher levels of traffic, consider organizing a "walking school bus," in which an adult accompanies a group of neighborhood children walking to school.
Be realistic about your child's pedestrian skills. Because small children are impulsive and less cautious around traffic, carefully consider whether or not your child is ready to walk to school without adult supervision. If the route home requires crossing busier streets than your child can reasonably do safely, have an adult, older friend or sibling es**rt them home.
If your children are young or are walking to a new school, walk with them or have another adult walk with them the first week or until you are sure they know the route and can do it safely. If your child will need to cross a street on the way to school, practice safe street crossing with them before the start of school.
Bright-colored clothing or a visibility device, like a vest or armband with reflectors, will make your child more visible to drivers.
EATING DURING THE SCHOOL DAY
Studies show that children who eat a nutritious breakfast function better. They do better in school, and have better concentration and more energy. Some schools provide breakfast for children; if yours does not, make sure they eat a breakfast that contains some protein.
Most schools regularly send schedules of cafeteria menus home and/or have them posted on the school's website. With this advance information, you can plan on packing lunch on the days when the main course is one your child prefers not to eat.
Many children qualify for free or reduced price food at school, including breakfast. The forms for these services can be completed at the school office. Hunger will affect a child's performance in class.
Many school districts have plans which allow you to pay for meals through an online account. Your child will get a card to "swipe" at the register. This is a convenient way to handle school meal accounts.
Look into what is offered inside and outside of the cafeteria, including vending machines, a la carte, school stores, snack carts and fundraisers held during the school day. All foods sold during the school day must meet nutrition standards established by the US Department of Agriculture (USDA). They should stock healthy choices such as fresh fruit, low-fat dairy products, water and 100 percent fruit juice. Learn about your child's school wellness policy and get involved in school groups to put it into effect. Also consider nutrition if you child will be bringing food to eat during school.
Each 12-ounce soft drink contains approximately 10 teaspoons of sugar and 150 calories. Drinking just one can of soda a day increases a child's risk of obesity by 60%. Choose healthier options (such as water and appropriately sized juice and low-fat dairy products) to send in your child's lunch.
BULLYING

Bullying or cyberbullying is when one child picks on another child repeatedly. Bullying can be physical, verbal, or social. It can happen at school, on the playground, on the school bus, in the neighborhood, over the Internet, or through mobile devices like cell phones.

When Your Child Is Bullied
Alert school officials to the problems and work with them on solutions.
Teach your child to be comfortable with when and how to ask a trusted adult for help. Ask them to identify who they can ask for help.
Recognize the serious nature of bullying and acknowledge your child's feelings about being bullied.
Help your child learn how to respond by teaching your child how to:
1. Look the bully in the eye.
2. Stand tall and stay calm in a difficult situation.
3. Walk away.
Teach your child how to say in a firm voice.
1. "I don't like what you are doing."
2. "Please do NOT talk to me like that."
Encourage your child to make friends with other children.
Support outside activities that interest your child.
Make sure an adult who knows about the bullying can watch out for your child's safety and well-being when you cannot be there.
Monitor your child's social media or texting interactions so you can identify problems before they get out of hand.
When Your Child Is the Bully
Be sure your child knows that bullying is never OK.
Set firm and consistent limits on your child's aggressive behavior.
Help your child learn empathy for other children by asking them to consider how the other child feels about the way your child treated them. Ask your child how they would feel if someone bullied them.
Be a positive role mode. Show children they can get what they want without teasing, threatening or hurting someone.
Use effective, non-physical discipline, such as loss of privileges.
Focus on praising your child when they behave in positive ways such as helping or being kind to other children as opposed to bullying them.
Develop practical solutions with the school principal, teachers, school social workers or psychologists, and parents of the children your child has bullied.
When Your Child Is a Bystander
Encourage your child to tell a trusted adult about the bullying. Encourage your child to join with others in telling bullies to stop.
Help your child support other children who may be bullied. Encourage your child to include these children in activities.
BEFORE AND AFTER SCHOOL CHILD CARE
During early and middle childhood, children need supervision. A responsible adult should be available to get them ready and off to school in the morning and supervise them after school until you return home from work.
If a family member will care for your child, communicate the need to follow consistent rules set by the parent regarding schedules, discipline and homework.
Children approaching adolescence (11- and 12-year-olds) should not come home to an empty house in the afternoon unless they show unusual maturity for their age.
If alternate adult supervision is not available, parents should make special efforts to supervise their children from a distance. Children should have a set time when they are expected to arrive at home and should check in with a neighbor or with a parent by telephone.
If you choose an after-school program for your child, inquire about the training of the staff. There should be a high staff-to-child ratio, trained persons to address health issues and emergencies, and the rooms and the playground should be safe.
DEVELOP A SLEEP ROUTINE
Getting enough sleep is critical for a child to be successful in school. Children who do not get enough sleep have difficulty concentrating and learning as well as they can.
Set a consistent bedtime for your child and stick with it every night. Having a bedtime routine that is consistent will help your child settle down and fall asleep. Components of a calming pre-bedtime routine may involve a bath/shower, reading with them, and tucking them in and saying good-night to them.
Have your child turn off electronic devices well before bedtime.
Try to have the home as quiet and calm as possible when younger children are trying to fall asleep.
Insufficient sleep is associated with lower academic achievement in middle school, high school and college, as well as higher rates of absenteeism and tardiness. The optimal amount of sleep for most younger children is 10-12 hours per night and for adolescents (13-18 year of age) is in the range of 8-10 hours per night.
DEVELOPING GOOD HOMEWORK AND STUDY HABITS
Create an environment that is conducive to doing homework starting at a young age. Children need a consistent work space in their bedroom or another part of the home that is quiet, without distractions, and promotes study.
Schedule ample time for homework; build this time into choices about participation in after school activities.
Establish a household rule that the TV and other electronic distractions stay off during homework time.
Supervise computer and Internet use.
By high school, it's not uncommon for teachers to ask students to submit homework electronically and perform other tasks on a computer. If your child doesn't have access to a computer or the internet at home, work with teachers and school administration to develop appropriate accommodations.
Be available to answer questions and offer assistance, but never do a child's homework for her.
Take steps to help alleviate eye fatigue, neck fatigue and brain fatigue while studying. It may be helpful to close the books for a few minutes, stretch, and take a break periodically when it will not be too disruptive.
If your child is struggling with a particular subject, speak with your child's teacher for recommendations on how you or another person can help your child at home or at school. If you have concerns about the assignments your child is receiving, talk with their teacher.
If your child is having difficulty focusing on or completing homework, discuss this with your child's teacher, school counselor, or health care provider.
For general homework problems that cannot be worked out with the teacher, a tutor may be considered.
Some children need extra help organizing their homework. Checklists, timers, and parental supervision can help overcome homework problems.
Some children may need help remembering their assignments. Work with your child and their teacher to develop an appropriate way to keep track of their assignments – such as an assignment notebook.

© 2017 - American Academy of Pediatrics

healthychildren.org Traffic crashes are the leading cause of death for teens and young adults. Parents can play an important role in keeping their teens safe behind the wheel. Before you let your teen drive, set specific rules that must be followed.

Location

Category

Telephone

Address


8335 Walnut Hill Lane, Suite 220
Dallas, TX
75231

Opening Hours

Monday 8am - 5pm
Tuesday 8am - 5pm
Wednesday 8am - 5pm
Thursday 8am - 5pm
Friday 8am - 5pm
Saturday 8am - 12pm
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