Friendly Healthcare Services, LLC

Friendly Healthcare Services, LLC has been in business since 2003 and is managed by a team of professionals with a passion for helping the elderly.

Our compassionate team at Friendly Healthcare Services, LLC is ready to provide the support and services you need. We'll meet with you to assess your home health needs and implement a comprehensive, personalized plan of care that is specific to the needs of the patient, the family, and your home environment. Our dedicated physicians, nurses, health aides, and medical workers are well prepared to a

Operating as usual

08/10/2017

Friendly Healthcare Services, LLC

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Friendly Healthcare Services, LLC Friendly Healthcare Services, LLC has been in business since 2003 and is managed by a team of professionals with a passion for helping the elderly.

Timeline photos 05/19/2017

Does Exercise Help Patients With Multiple Sclerosis?:
Exercise has been proven to improve function and quality of life for those living with an array of diseases. A recent study finds that multiple sclerosis (MS) patients are among those who benefit from physical activity. Multiple sclerosis is a disease that affects the brain and spinal cord, where the nerves of the brain and spinal cord are damaged by one’s own immune system. This results in loss of muscle control, vision, balance, and sensation (such as numbness).

120 people with MS were randomly assigned to one of two groups: usual care plus a 12 week exercise program or usual care only. The individuals in the first group participated in a supervised, home exercise program which was called Exercise Intervention for People with MS (EXIMS) by the research team. At nine-month follow-up, the study shows that the patients in the exercise program group reported improvements in fatigue and emotional well-being, social function, and other health-related quality of life measures. This group also continued with higher levels of physical activity after participating in the study.

Aerobic exercise was the key type with walking being the most common activity. Participants completed short bouts of activity followed by intervals of rest. As the study advanced, the periods of exercise increased while the rest time decreased. To encourage long-term exercise habits, the group was also taught cognitive-behavioral techniques, such as goal setting, finding social support, and understanding the benefit of physical activity.

If you are your loved one suffers from multiple sclerosis or other illnesses, give us a call for a supervised, home exercise program to meet your needs. Under certain conditions, retirees can receive these physical therapy programs at home, with Medicare paying 100%.

Source: Saxton J, Carter A, Daley A, et al. Pragmatic exercise intervention for people with multiple sclerosis (ExIMS Trial): Study protocol for a randomised controlled trial. Contemporary Clinical Trials, 2013; 34 (2): 205-211.


More: http://friendlyhc.nwsltr.info/2017/05/does-exercise-help-patients-with-multiple-sclerosis/

Does Exercise Help Patients With Multiple Sclerosis?:
Exercise has been proven to improve function and quality of life for those living with an array of diseases. A recent study finds that multiple sclerosis (MS) patients are among those who benefit from physical activity. Multiple sclerosis is a disease that affects the brain and spinal cord, where the nerves of the brain and spinal cord are damaged by one’s own immune system. This results in loss of muscle control, vision, balance, and sensation (such as numbness).

120 people with MS were randomly assigned to one of two groups: usual care plus a 12 week exercise program or usual care only. The individuals in the first group participated in a supervised, home exercise program which was called Exercise Intervention for People with MS (EXIMS) by the research team. At nine-month follow-up, the study shows that the patients in the exercise program group reported improvements in fatigue and emotional well-being, social function, and other health-related quality of life measures. This group also continued with higher levels of physical activity after participating in the study.

Aerobic exercise was the key type with walking being the most common activity. Participants completed short bouts of activity followed by intervals of rest. As the study advanced, the periods of exercise increased while the rest time decreased. To encourage long-term exercise habits, the group was also taught cognitive-behavioral techniques, such as goal setting, finding social support, and understanding the benefit of physical activity.

If you are your loved one suffers from multiple sclerosis or other illnesses, give us a call for a supervised, home exercise program to meet your needs. Under certain conditions, retirees can receive these physical therapy programs at home, with Medicare paying 100%.

Source: Saxton J, Carter A, Daley A, et al. Pragmatic exercise intervention for people with multiple sclerosis (ExIMS Trial): Study protocol for a randomised controlled trial. Contemporary Clinical Trials, 2013; 34 (2): 205-211.


More: http://friendlyhc.nwsltr.info/2017/05/does-exercise-help-patients-with-multiple-sclerosis/

Timeline photos 05/08/2017

Sleep Problems Linked to Stroke Risk:
A recent study indicates that sleep disorders are linked to increased stroke risk. Sleep-breathing problems like sleep apnea have the strongest association to stroke risk. However, sleep-wake disorders, such as hypersomnia, insomnia, and restless leg syndrome could also raise the threat of a stroke. In addition to increasing the risk of first-time stroke, sleep difficulties can also affect recovery, outcomes, and the possibility of recurrence for people who have already suffered a stroke.

Researchers reviewed data from multiple studies that focused on the sleep-stroke connection. The study authors recommend increased testing for sleep disorders especially for recovering stroke patients. In addition to stroke, sleep disorders have been linked to other health problems including Alzheimer’s disease, depression, and weight gain.

Source: Hermann D, Bassetti C. Role of sleep-disordered breathing and sleep-wake disturbances for stroke and stroke recovery. Neurology, Sept 2016; 87(13): 1407-1416.


More: http://friendlyhc.nwsltr.info/2017/05/sleep-problems-linked-to-stroke-risk/

Sleep Problems Linked to Stroke Risk:
A recent study indicates that sleep disorders are linked to increased stroke risk. Sleep-breathing problems like sleep apnea have the strongest association to stroke risk. However, sleep-wake disorders, such as hypersomnia, insomnia, and restless leg syndrome could also raise the threat of a stroke. In addition to increasing the risk of first-time stroke, sleep difficulties can also affect recovery, outcomes, and the possibility of recurrence for people who have already suffered a stroke.

Researchers reviewed data from multiple studies that focused on the sleep-stroke connection. The study authors recommend increased testing for sleep disorders especially for recovering stroke patients. In addition to stroke, sleep disorders have been linked to other health problems including Alzheimer’s disease, depression, and weight gain.

Source: Hermann D, Bassetti C. Role of sleep-disordered breathing and sleep-wake disturbances for stroke and stroke recovery. Neurology, Sept 2016; 87(13): 1407-1416.


More: http://friendlyhc.nwsltr.info/2017/05/sleep-problems-linked-to-stroke-risk/

Timeline photos 04/25/2017

You Really are Only as Old as You Feel:
A recent study finds that those who feel younger than they really are live longer than those who feel their age or older. The study included nearly 6,500 participants whose average age was 65.8 years. Researchers analyzed the survival rates of the participants over an eight year follow-up period. The study shows the individuals who feel younger than their actual age have a 13% increase in survival rate over those who feel older, as well as a 5% increase over those who feel their true age.

The authors say those who feel younger tend to have a healthier lifestyle, experience less stress, and adhere to medical advice. The great news is self-perceived age can change and we can help. If you are ever injured, ill, or recovering, home health can help you implement a therapeutic diet and a safe exercise plan in the comfort of home. The added attention we provide during multiple, friendly visits to your home gives you every advantage in fully implementing your medical instructions and aids in pursuing a healthier lifestyle.

Source: Rippon I, Steptoe A. Feeling old vs being old: associations between self-perceived age and mortality. JAMA Internal Medicine, 2015; 175 (2): 307-309.


More: http://friendlyhc.nwsltr.info/2017/04/you-really-are-only-as-old-as-you-feel/

You Really are Only as Old as You Feel:
A recent study finds that those who feel younger than they really are live longer than those who feel their age or older. The study included nearly 6,500 participants whose average age was 65.8 years. Researchers analyzed the survival rates of the participants over an eight year follow-up period. The study shows the individuals who feel younger than their actual age have a 13% increase in survival rate over those who feel older, as well as a 5% increase over those who feel their true age.

The authors say those who feel younger tend to have a healthier lifestyle, experience less stress, and adhere to medical advice. The great news is self-perceived age can change and we can help. If you are ever injured, ill, or recovering, home health can help you implement a therapeutic diet and a safe exercise plan in the comfort of home. The added attention we provide during multiple, friendly visits to your home gives you every advantage in fully implementing your medical instructions and aids in pursuing a healthier lifestyle.

Source: Rippon I, Steptoe A. Feeling old vs being old: associations between self-perceived age and mortality. JAMA Internal Medicine, 2015; 175 (2): 307-309.


More: http://friendlyhc.nwsltr.info/2017/04/you-really-are-only-as-old-as-you-feel/

Timeline photos 04/08/2017

Poor Balance May Signal Higher Risk of Dementia:
A new study analyzed the association between four different measures of physical performance and the risk of dementia for great-grandparents. The researchers, from the University of California at Irvine, observed a strong link between dementia risk and poor performance on the standing balance test. Additionally, a small association was also found between developing dementia and performing poorly on the four-meter walk and handgrip tests.

The study included nearly 600 adults, aged 90 and older. In addition to the physical performance tests, the participants underwent physical and neurological exams and cognitive tests. During a follow-up period of two-and-a-half years, 40 percent developed dementia. Since balance and walking require complex brain activity, testing these functions may help predict who might be most at risk for developing dementia.

Source: Bullain S, Corrada M, Perry S, Kawas C. Sound Body Sound Mind? Physical Performance and the Risk of Dementia in the Oldest-Old: The 90+ Study. Journal of the American Geriatrics Society, 2016; 64 (7): 1408.


More: http://friendlyhc.nwsltr.info/2017/04/poor-balance-may-signal-higher-risk-of-dementia/

Poor Balance May Signal Higher Risk of Dementia:
A new study analyzed the association between four different measures of physical performance and the risk of dementia for great-grandparents. The researchers, from the University of California at Irvine, observed a strong link between dementia risk and poor performance on the standing balance test. Additionally, a small association was also found between developing dementia and performing poorly on the four-meter walk and handgrip tests.

The study included nearly 600 adults, aged 90 and older. In addition to the physical performance tests, the participants underwent physical and neurological exams and cognitive tests. During a follow-up period of two-and-a-half years, 40 percent developed dementia. Since balance and walking require complex brain activity, testing these functions may help predict who might be most at risk for developing dementia.

Source: Bullain S, Corrada M, Perry S, Kawas C. Sound Body Sound Mind? Physical Performance and the Risk of Dementia in the Oldest-Old: The 90+ Study. Journal of the American Geriatrics Society, 2016; 64 (7): 1408.


More: http://friendlyhc.nwsltr.info/2017/04/poor-balance-may-signal-higher-risk-of-dementia/

Timeline photos 03/25/2017

Know Your Medications:
True or False? Over-the-counter (OTC) pain medications are safe to use. Generally speaking, this statement is true as long as they are taken as directed. The problem is the growing concern of misuse of non-prescription medicine, especially those containing acetaminophen.

One recent study observed 500 adults, age 18-80, and their use of acetaminophen based non-prescription drugs over a 24-hour period. The participants were given the task to apportion out doses of the meds for the day and were asked about the safety of taking additional medications with the first.

The results of the study are startling. About 24% of the participants surpassed the recommended dosage in a 24-hour period, either by putting out too many pills at one dosing or by spacing the doses too closely together. What’s more, nearly half of the adults in the study mixed more than one acetaminophen product in one dosing.
To avoid misuse of OTC pain medications, read all the labels and pay close attention to the dosage information and maximum number of pills allowed in a 24-hour time span. Write down the time you take a dose so as not to mistakenly take more too soon. If the pain persists, consult your doctor.
Source: Wolf M, King J, Jacobson K, et al. Risk of unintentional overdose with non-prescription acetaminophen products. Journal of General Internal Medicine. 2012 Dec; 27 (12): 1587-1593.


More: http://friendlyhc.nwsltr.info/2017/03/know-your-medications/

Know Your Medications:
True or False? Over-the-counter (OTC) pain medications are safe to use. Generally speaking, this statement is true as long as they are taken as directed. The problem is the growing concern of misuse of non-prescription medicine, especially those containing acetaminophen.

One recent study observed 500 adults, age 18-80, and their use of acetaminophen based non-prescription drugs over a 24-hour period. The participants were given the task to apportion out doses of the meds for the day and were asked about the safety of taking additional medications with the first.

The results of the study are startling. About 24% of the participants surpassed the recommended dosage in a 24-hour period, either by putting out too many pills at one dosing or by spacing the doses too closely together. What’s more, nearly half of the adults in the study mixed more than one acetaminophen product in one dosing.
To avoid misuse of OTC pain medications, read all the labels and pay close attention to the dosage information and maximum number of pills allowed in a 24-hour time span. Write down the time you take a dose so as not to mistakenly take more too soon. If the pain persists, consult your doctor.
Source: Wolf M, King J, Jacobson K, et al. Risk of unintentional overdose with non-prescription acetaminophen products. Journal of General Internal Medicine. 2012 Dec; 27 (12): 1587-1593.


More: http://friendlyhc.nwsltr.info/2017/03/know-your-medications/

Timeline photos 03/12/2017

Exercise Benefits Stroke Survivors Both Physically and Mentally:
A stroke often cuts off blood flow to the brain and impairs vital cognitive abilities such as thinking, remembering, and learning. However, new research finds a post-stroke exercise program aids in not only physical recovery for survivors, but mental as well.

Researchers analyzed records from 13 clinical trials that included a total of 639 patients recovering from a stroke. Participants who exercised showed greater gains in mental abilities, especially attention and processing speed, versus those who didn’t exercise. Structured exercise programs aimed at strength, balance, stretching, and aerobic fitness were the most effective.

Lead author Lauren Oberlin and her team say exercise improves blood flow to the brain, promotes the growth of new brain cells, and reduces inflammation. Oberlin presented the findings last month at the International Stroke Conference in Houston, Texas.

SOURCES: Lauren Oberlin, M.S., graduate student, psychology, University of Pittsburgh; Daniel Lackland, Dr.P.H., spokesman, American Stroke Association, and professor, medicine, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston; Feb. 22, 2017, presentation, International Stroke Conference, Houston


More: http://friendlyhc.nwsltr.info/2017/03/exercise-benefits-stroke-survivors-both-physically-and-mentally/

Exercise Benefits Stroke Survivors Both Physically and Mentally:
A stroke often cuts off blood flow to the brain and impairs vital cognitive abilities such as thinking, remembering, and learning. However, new research finds a post-stroke exercise program aids in not only physical recovery for survivors, but mental as well.

Researchers analyzed records from 13 clinical trials that included a total of 639 patients recovering from a stroke. Participants who exercised showed greater gains in mental abilities, especially attention and processing speed, versus those who didn’t exercise. Structured exercise programs aimed at strength, balance, stretching, and aerobic fitness were the most effective.

Lead author Lauren Oberlin and her team say exercise improves blood flow to the brain, promotes the growth of new brain cells, and reduces inflammation. Oberlin presented the findings last month at the International Stroke Conference in Houston, Texas.

SOURCES: Lauren Oberlin, M.S., graduate student, psychology, University of Pittsburgh; Daniel Lackland, Dr.P.H., spokesman, American Stroke Association, and professor, medicine, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston; Feb. 22, 2017, presentation, International Stroke Conference, Houston


More: http://friendlyhc.nwsltr.info/2017/03/exercise-benefits-stroke-survivors-both-physically-and-mentally/

Location

Telephone

Address


11325 Pegasus Street, Ste W101
Dallas, TX
75238

Opening Hours

Monday 8:30am - 5pm
Tuesday 8:30am - 5pm
Wednesday 8:30am - 5pm
Thursday 8:30am - 5pm
Friday 8:30am - 5pm
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