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medical student + pediatric urologist at the University of Alberta educating teens, parents and learners about testicular health

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It's   and today we're talking about something else that can cause scrotal pain - Orchitis!Orchitis is inflammation of o...
03/23/2022

It's and today we're talking about something else that can cause scrotal pain - Orchitis!

Orchitis is inflammation of one or both testicles that can cause similar symptoms as testicular torsion. This
includes things like testicular or scrotal pain, nausea or stomach aches, and testicular swelling. It can also cause fever or pain when peeing.

Orchitis can be caused by bacterial or viral infections, including sexually transmitted infections. Mumps is
also a common viral cause of Orchitis.

It's important to get any scrotal or testicular pain checked by your doctor to correctly diagnose and receive treatment as soon as possible!

Make the call instead of losing your ball.





Do you know the signs of testicular torsion to look out for? ⚽️ sudden, severe testicular pain🏀 swelling, redness, or an...
03/09/2022

Do you know the signs of testicular torsion to look out for?

⚽️ sudden, severe testicular pain
🏀 swelling, redness, or an elevated testicle
🎾 nausea or vomiting
⚾️ abdominal pain

If you have any of these symptoms lasting more than 2 hours it’s important to see a doctor. Getting medical attention within 6 hours of the onset of torsion is essential to saving your testicle, don’t leave it hanging.

**es **estalk **es

It’s the 1st of the month, which means it’s time for a Teste Tip! February’s tip is to set a reminder in your calendar e...
02/02/2022

It’s the 1st of the month, which means it’s time for a Teste Tip! February’s tip is to set a reminder in your calendar each month to make sure you don’t miss your testicular self-exam.

Why are these so important? Males aged 18-35 have the highest risk for developing testicular cancer, so it’s best to start the habit early! Doing an exam every month helps make sure you don’t miss early warning signs, and helps you spot other changes like the ones that happen with testicular torsion.

Did you know that one study found that only 18% of men had heard of testicular self-exams? Don’t be a statistic, do yours today.

Happy holidays from Teste Talk! ❄️
12/23/2021

Happy holidays from Teste Talk! ❄️

Have you done your testicular self exam this month? If not, here’s how: 1. Examine each testicle separately. Look out fo...
11/30/2021

Have you done your testicular self exam this month? If not, here’s how:

1. Examine each testicle separately. Look out for any lumps, swelling, changes in colour or size, or any other changes that stick around.

2. Hold the testicle firmly between your thumb and pointer finger. Roll it between your fingers from top to bottom, being sure to check every area.

3. Familiarize yourself with the structures of the testicle. The s***matic cord attaches to the testicle - this is what becomes twisted in testicular torsion! The epididymis is a coiled tube at the back of the testicle that transports s***m, and may feel like a lump.

Feel any abnormal lumps or changes? Tell someone! It's important to talk to an adult and a doctor about any changes you experience as soon as possible.

It’s Movember!! November is known around the world as Men’s Health Awareness Month.  is a charity and movement focused o...
11/02/2021

It’s Movember!! November is known around the world as Men’s Health Awareness Month. is a charity and movement focused on mental health and su***de prevention, as well as testicular and prostate cancer! We’ll be participating with the University of Alberta Medical School team this year, running 60km to raise awareness for these important causes! As always, November will be full of posts on testicular cancer, how to talk about it, and what to do if you’re worried about it. Happy movember! 🥸

**es

It’s time for our second Teste Talk Giveaway!! We have one $80 giftcard to a place of your choice up for grabs! Here’s h...
09/23/2021

It’s time for our second Teste Talk Giveaway!! We have one $80 giftcard to a place of your choice up for grabs!

Here’s how to enter:
1. Like this post
2. Follow us
3. Tag a friend in the comments - each comment = one entry!

For an additional entry, share one of our previous posts to your story!

Contest closes Thursday, October 7th, 2021. Winner will be chosen by random draw and contacted by DM. This contest is not sponsored, endorsed, or administered by, or associated with, Instagram.

It’s   and this week we’re back to talking about testicular torsion!!⚽️ Torsion is a medical emergency that can happen t...
09/14/2021

It’s and this week we’re back to talking about testicular torsion!!
⚽️ Torsion is a medical emergency that can happen to anyone with testicles, but is most common in ages 13-18
🏀 Signs and Symptoms commonly include sudden, severe testicular/scrotal pain, stomach pain, nausea, vomiting, and a high-riding testicle
⚾️ Surgical treatment for torsion is very effective, but needs to happen within 4-6 hours from the onset of symptoms for the best chance of saving the testicle
🎾 If you experience the signs and symptoms of torsion lasting 2+ hours, don’t delay! Make the call instead of losing your ball, and head to the nearest emergency room

Did you know that 1 in 250 males will be diagnosed with testicular cancer at some point in their lifetime, and that test...
07/20/2021

Did you know that 1 in 250 males will be diagnosed with testicular cancer at some point in their lifetime, and that testicular cancer is most common in 15-34 year old men? Testicular cancer is also very treatable if caught early! This is why it’s so important to know what to look out for, and to keep up with your testicular self-exams (look back a post for info on this!) Stay tuned for upcoming posts where we will talk about all things testicular cancer.

**es

Don't drop the ball on testicular self-exams. It's important to do these monthly! When was your last testicular self-exa...
07/20/2021

Don't drop the ball on testicular self-exams. It's important to do these monthly! When was your last testicular self-exam?

1. Examine each testicle seperately. It's important to look out for any lumps, swelling, changes in color or size, or any other abnormalities that stick around.

2. Hold the testicle firmly between your thumb and pointer finger. Roll it between your fingers from top to bottom, being sure to check every area.

3. Familiarize yourself with the structures of the testicle. The s***matic cord attaches to the testicle - this is what becomes twisted in testicular torsion! The epididymis is a coiled tube that transports s***m, and may feel like a lump.

Feel anything abnormal? Tell someone! It's important to talk to an adult and a doctor about any changes you experience as soon as possible.

Happy  ! Testicular torsion is a medical emergency. Know the signs and symptoms so you can spot it quickly and save your...
06/29/2021

Happy !

Testicular torsion is a medical emergency. Know the signs and symptoms so you can spot it quickly and save your ball! If you notice any testicular changes, talk to your doctor or a trusted adult. If you experience severe pain for more than 2 hours, go to the nearest emergency room.

Don’t delay - Make the call instead of losing your ball.

**es

About 5 in every 100,000 males under 25 gets testicular torsion every year, but what causes it? The cause of torsion is ...
06/29/2021

About 5 in every 100,000 males under 25 gets testicular torsion every year, but what causes it? The cause of torsion is often unknown, but there are some situtations that may make it more likely.

Bell-Clapper: Most cases of testicular torsion are caused by a "bell-clapper deformity." This is an abnormlity of the testicle that allow it to rotate more freely, and may cause it to lie horizontally in the sc***um. You likely won't know if you have this, and most cases of bell-clapper do not result in testicular torsion, but the risk is higher if you do.

Trauma: Some cases of torsion have been linked to trauma (like getting kicked really hard in the balls) Although this is rare, its still a good idea to minimize trauma as much as possible!

Vigorous physical activity: Sometimes, torsion can occur during or after strenuous exercise, such as sports. This is also rare, but its a good idea to pay attention to any pain you may have afterwards.

Sleep: While the sleep itself doesn't cause torsion, many cases do happen spontaneously during your sleep!

No matter the cause, be sure to check your testicles regularly so that you know what normal is, and pay attention to any changes! It is most important that you seek medical attention for any pain lasting more than 2 hours!

**es **es

It’s  ! It’s important to talk about testicular torsion! If you think you may have torsion, or if you experience any of ...
06/29/2021

It’s !

It’s important to talk about testicular torsion! If you think you may have torsion, or if you experience any of the symptoms, seek medical attention as soon as possible. Don’t delay!

If you have any concerning testicular changes, talk to someone you trust and ask your doctor for more information. If the changes are sudden or you have any pain, go straight to the emergency room.

Don’t forget, if it twists - you shout 🗣

What are the signs & symptoms of testicular torsion?? In our recent poll, 72% of respondents knew what testicular torsio...
06/29/2021

What are the signs & symptoms of testicular torsion??

In our recent poll, 72% of respondents knew what testicular torsion was, but only 28% knew the signs and symptoms.

Here's what you need to be on the lookout for! The most common symptom is sudden, severe testicular or scrotal pain that is usually on one side. Nausea and vomitting are also common, and a study by Pogorelic et al. (2013) found that abdominal pain is present in up to 20% of patients who have testicular torsion.

Your testicle may also be swollen, red, and appear to be elevated, high-riding, or lying horizontally.

These are all signs of testicular torsion and should be taken seriously! If you have any sudden, severe testicular pain, testicular changes, or unexplained abdominal pain seek medical attention as soon as possible.

**es

It’s  ! Let’s talk about testicular torsion! What is it? Testicular torsion is a medical emergency that happens when the...
06/09/2021

It’s ! Let’s talk about testicular torsion!

What is it? Testicular torsion is a medical emergency that happens when the s***matic cord twists and blocks blood flow to and from the testicle.

How do you recognize it? The most important symptoms to look out for are sudden, severe testicular/scrotal pain that may radiate to the groin or lower abdominal areas, and nausea or vomitting. The testicle may also appear swollen, red, or elevated, and will likely be tender to touch.

Who is at risk? Torsion can happen to anyone, but is most common in people aged 12-18.

What do you need to do about it? If you suspect torsion, seek medical attention ASAP. In order to save the testicle, medical intervention is required within 4-6 hours of the start of symptoms.

Don’t delay, make the call instead of losing your ball!!

Teste Talk is your source for reliable, evidence-based information about all things te**es. It was created by a medical ...
06/07/2021

Teste Talk is your source for reliable, evidence-based information about all things te**es. It was created by a medical student and pediatric urologist at the University of Alberta. Together they saw a need for more education around adolescent health, testicular health, and particularly testicular torsion. Don’t put your health to the test(es)! Follow along on our Instagram, Twitter, and pages to learn more!

Meet the team behind Teste Talk! Taylor is a medical student at the University of Alberta working on a summer research p...
06/01/2021

Meet the team behind Teste Talk!

Taylor is a medical student at the University of Alberta working on a summer research project on testicular torsion with Dr. Metcalfe. She is interested in urology, adolescent health, and health promotion. Outside of medicine Taylor loves trail running, ice climbing, and exploring the mountains!

Dr. Peter Metcalfe has been a pediatric urologist at the Stollery Children’s Hospital since 2006. He holds many roles including Associate Professor at the University of Alberta, and Program Director for the Division of Urology. One of his main research interest is the prevention of testicular torsion.

Learn more about the team on our website!

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Edmonton, AB

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