Paloma Seniors Care

Paloma Seniors Care We understand the importance of aging at home, let us help with some of the challenges. Paloma Seni

Nicole Kulba is a Certified Therapy Recreation Specialist and has been working in the field of Therapeutic Recreation for 11 years. Her background has included geriatric mental health, dementia care and working in a long term care environment. She is a member of both the Alberta Therapeutic Recreation Association and the Canadian Therapeutic Recreation Association.

2019 Innovative Practitioner

of the year - Alberta Therapeutic Recreation Association

Tofield Health Foundation recognition article - https://tofieldmerc.com/2019/12/18/long-term-care-staff-recognized-by-tofield-area-health-services-foundation/

February is Recreation Therapy month… this is why we are the perfect addition to aging in place.
02/02/2022

February is Recreation Therapy month… this is why we are the perfect addition to aging in place.

01/27/2022

Understanding Dementia: It’s not about the family you had, but the family you make.

Teepa snow

Understanding…..
01/19/2022

Understanding…..

Paloma Seniors Care understands the importance of aging at home. We provide the tools you need to care for loved ones at home

01/17/2022

Repetitive Vocalizations
Repetitive Vocalizations occur in many people. The term includes any excessively loud and/or repetitive vocalizations, such
as single words or phrases, nonsensical sounds, screaming, moaning, or constant requests for attention. These behaviours
can be difficult to manage, and can lead to significant caregiver burden and distress.

Possible Triggers of Repetitive Vocalizations:
 Pain/discomfort
 Medical issues (e.g., urinary tract infections)
 Hunger
 Physical environment
 Stress/anxiety re: over- or under-stimulation
 Caregiver behaviours (e.g., pace of care)

Things to know...
 Repetitive vocalizations may provide a form
of self-soothing and are not malicious.
 Behaviour often does not respond to
medication.
 Behavioural approaches and changes to the
environment tend to show the greatest benefit.

01/13/2022
5 Tips for Communicating Better When Dementia Is InvolvedWhen a person is living with dementia, communication can someti...
01/15/2021

5 Tips for Communicating Better When Dementia Is Involved

When a person is living with dementia, communication can sometimes become difficult. As a person’s brain is changing, their ability to comprehend and process vocabulary can decrease. Learning how to get started at communicating better can therefore become critically important. We sometimes underestimate how soon issues with communication start and may miss the early signals that someone is probably struggling a bit more than they used to.

Every one of us has been in a situation where you couldn’t think of the right word, and so had to pause. In a healthy brain, the normal reaction to someone offering you a word is: oh good, now we can move on. Whereas when someone is living with dementia, suddenly jumping in with a word can cause confusion, as now they have to look at that word and figure out if that’s the word they were looking for. And when you factor in memory problems, it’s probable they’ll have a hard time remembering what their word was in the first place.

Matching your pace to theirs: If your person living with dementia is beginning to slow down, Teepa suggests slowing yourself down a bit as well. By practicing being more comfortable with pauses and not rushing in right away to make suggestions, you are giving the person living with dementia an extra moment to possibly recall the word they were looking for.

Reflection: If the person living with dementia continues to struggle with word-finding, rather than adding to what he or she said, it can be very helpful to first repeat back to them what you heard. By doing so, the person living with dementia can hear what they’ve said so far, which can help them continue the conversation.
For example, if a person says I’m looking for something to…uhhh…, you might give the person a moment, and then assist by saying So you’re looking for something you could…*pause*, and see if your person living with dementia can fill in the blank.

This or something else: If your person living with dementia is still struggling to find a word, you might ask: Are you looking for something to drink, or something else? By offering one specific word and one overly general word, you’re less likely to distract the person living with dementia from the word they’re trying to think of, but still assist them in communicating with you as you’ve given them two words he or she can say.

As Teepa recently explained, the This or Something Else approach is referred to as exclusionary categories, which can be very helpful as they assist but don’t limit the person living with dementia to anything specific.

Tell me more about it (Circumlocution): If you’re still unsure what your person living with dementia is trying to communicate, try asking: Can you tell me more about it? With this question, what you’re really asking for is do you have other words you could use aside from the one you’re looking for? And if they use these other words to talk around the word they’re missing (a process called circumlocution), it can help you as a care partner figure out what they’re trying to communicate.

Visuals: When word-processing abilities decrease as the brain changes, pointing at a related object when talking to your person living with dementia can help increase mutual understanding. For example, if you’re trying to find out what your person living with dementia would like to drink, you could ask Would you like a coffee [pointing at a coffee mug], or something else? Being able to see the object you’re asking about will likely help your person living with dementia process your question, and make communication a little bit easier.

Bilinguals: People who speak multiple languages may have a harder time as their brain begins to change, as they have two vocabulary sets to go look in when trying to find a word and communicate. So if you are a care partner of a person who has English as their second language, you may benefit from getting really good, really fast by integrating objects into your communications, not just words.

As you're trying out these communication tips, don't get discouraged if you forget a tip or rush to answer when the person living with dementia may have just needed a moment more. As with anything worth doing in life, practice is the key to suceess. Or as Jim Rohn famously said: "Success is nothing more than a few simple disciplines, practiced every day."
Teepa Snow = www.teepasnow.com

Teepa Snow, with Positive Approach to Care, offers training, connection, and education for all living or working with dementia to improve quality of life.

01/07/2021

Happiness Cup
a quarter cup of friendship and one cup of thoughtfulness

Stir together with a pinch of tenderness

Very lightly blend in a bowl of loyalty wit a cup of charity, faith and hope

Be sure to add a spoonful each of gaiety and truth that sings and also the ability to laugh at things

Moisten with a sudden tears of heartfelt sympathy

heat in a good nurtured kettle and serve repeatedly

Source Unknown

Activities for Person’s living with Dementia: Music - Playing someone with Alzheimer’s music from their favorite era wil...
01/05/2021

Activities for Person’s living with Dementia:
Music - Playing someone with Alzheimer’s music from their favorite era will help remind them of joyful moments and create a feeling of relaxation and calmness for them. Try playing music for different moments of the day. Happy, joyful music can be perfect for an afternoon dance session. This will get them moving, it’s a fun way to give them some exercise. Play relaxing music when they are winding down for the day and it’s almost bedtime.

Take a Walk - Taking a walk in nature can be a very beneficial and calming activity for those living with Alzheimer’s. It’s great for exercise, enjoying the outdoors and giving them access to the beauty of nature. Make sure they are prepared for their walk. Equip them with a walker or wheelchair depending on their mobility. Have them in proper footwear that’s comfortable and easy to put on, but that will also keep them safe. That way walking can be a fun activity for both of you and not a stressful one.

Household Chores - Doing household chores is a great way for someone living with Alzheimer’s to keep a daily routine and make them feel in charge of their life by keeping their own space clean. It can be as easy giving them clothes to fold, or a duster that they can pick up and start dusting when they feel agitated. Cleaning can be a meditative activity and can help reduce stress from confusion.

Puzzles - Doing simple puzzles with shapes and colors offers brain and sensory stimulation which helps keeps the mind active. There are many different types of puzzles from word games to simply pictures. Match the puzzle with their level of cognition.

Art/Crafting - Painting and doing art projects allows someone living with Alzheimer’s an outlet to be creative and helps keep their fine motor skills sharp. In Long Term Care Facilities there is often an arts and crafts room or daily art time. If your loved one is in one of these facilities, ask the nurses when these times are and mark them on a calendar so your loved one can participate in the activity.

Cook a Meal - Cooking a very simple meal with not a lot of ingredients is a great way to keep the Alzheimer’s sufferer active and helps them feel accomplished. Many seniors programs have a cooking element in them. See if you can find any activities or programs that revolve around cooking to make a schedule for them.

Watch Home Videos - This is a great way to reminisce on the past and jog lovely memories for the patient. Familiar faces in the home videos will help your loved one remember. It will also cause less confusion if they are seeing familiar faces instead of new ones. Family home videos allow them to watch short clips instead of having to follow a long story line.

Organize Personal Items - Depending on the patients past, engage them in simple organization of things from their past. Examples are: organizing office supplies, arranging books they liked to read, organizing photographs etc.

Gardening - Gardening is a very calming activity that involves repetition and is easy to do. Working in a garden also gives those living with Alzheimer’s a nice daily activity that gets them outside in nature.

It’s important to remember that people living with Dementia can get frustrated and embarrassed very easily as their declining cognition leaves them feeling trapped. Loved ones should be in charge of the activities they partake in. Having options and the freedom of choice helps them feel empowered and more in control of their life.

8 Tips for Supporting Aging Parents who won't consider your "helpful requests"1. Try to understand the motivation behind...
01/03/2021

8 Tips for Supporting Aging Parents who won't consider your "helpful requests"

1. Try to understand the motivation behind their behavior, asking yourself some key questions about your loved ones’ behavior:
• Are they acting this way out of habit?
• To assert independence?
• Due to depression?
• Because they’re confused or have dementia?
• What are they afraid of?
Identifying the root cause, or causes, of your parents’ behavior can help you identify the best way to make positive changes.

2. Accept the situation - While you might wish you could control your elderly parents for their own good, the reality is you can’t force them to do anything. Your parents are adults with the right to make decisions — even poor ones.” Accepting this fact — as hard as it is — can help lower your stress and even improve your relationship.

3. Choose your battles - People don’t respond well to nagging, real or perceived. In the long run, it might help your case to stop insisting your parents update their phones, join a fitness class or complete other beneficial, but nonessential, tasks. Instead, decide what issues are the most important and focus on them — at least initially. Matters involving your parents’ safety, for instance, should take top priority.

4. Don’t beat yourself up - Do not to hit your head against the wall too hard. There isn’t a lot we can do sometimes but stand by, watch closely, and be able to jump in when needed.”

5. Treat your aging parents like adults - While it may feel as if you and your parents have switched roles at times, they’re still your parents, and want to be treated with respect. When it comes to dealing with aging parents, remember this: Above all, the goal is to help your parents receive the best care possible. You’re much more likely to get positive results by treating your aging parents like the adults that they are. This goes for simple tasks, such as helping your parents remember to take their medications, and harder tasks, like helping them get treatment for diabetes.

6. Ask them to do it for the kids (or grand kids) - If your mom isn’t willing to change her behavior for herself, maybe she will for a loved one. Another approach to dealing with aging parents is to be direct about how it affects you. Communicate your worries to your parent, and explain how your anxieties will be tempered if he or she follows your advice.

7. Find an outlet for your feelings - If you’re angry or resentful that your elderly parent refuses to move to a safer living situation or take their medication as directed, it’s important to vent — but not to your parents. Instead, confide in, or strategize with, a friend, sibling, therapist, online support group or senior living advisor.

8. Plan ahead — and talk about those plans - Even if your parent has not been diagnosed with Alzheimer’s disease or dementia, living with any kind of memory loss can be very difficult for seniors to deal with, or even acknowledge. Helping your aging parents remember important dates eases frustration for everyone.
Is there a family celebration they want to attend that’s coming up, such as an anniversary, graduation or wedding? Bring it up. Talk about it frequently. Share in the excitement together.

Contact us at Paloma Seniors Care and we can support you as you implement these tools to better care for your loved ones.
www.palomaseniorscare.ca

01/01/2021

Happy New Year... All the best in 2021!!

Now that we are saying good-bye to 2020 and welcoming in the New Year it is time to focus on what your 2021 resolution w...
12/30/2020

Now that we are saying good-bye to 2020 and welcoming in the New Year it is time to focus on what your 2021 resolution will be? Will it be Self-care so you can support your loved one better? Will it be to educate yourself and your family so you can have meaningful engagements? Will it be providing 1 to 1 therapeutic engagements so your loved one maintains or finds new purpose?
At Paloma Seniors Care we can help you achieve your Care Partner and family goals and help build new memories of Joy. Contact us and lets develop a Care Plan that is person focused and meets your care needs together. www.palomaseniorscare.ca

Paloma Seniors Care understands the importance of aging at home. We provide the tools you need to care for loved ones at home

Wishing everyone a very Merry Christmas and all the best in the New Year!  We at Paloma enjoyed a visit by Santa and it ...
12/24/2020

Wishing everyone a very Merry Christmas and all the best in the New Year! We at Paloma enjoyed a visit by Santa and it turns out we were all on the NICE list!!!

Dementia is a general term for loss of memory, language, problem-solving and other thinking abilities that are severe en...
12/17/2020

Dementia is a general term for loss of memory, language, problem-solving and other thinking abilities that are severe enough to interfere with daily life.
Four Truths of Dementia:
1. At least 2 parts of the brain are actively dying.
2. It is progressive (always changing - chemistry then structure changes)
3. It is a chronic condition (there is no cure or treatment that will stop, turn around, or fix it)
4. It is terminal (but so is life!)
Because dementia affects the brain chemistry long before the symptoms may show, dementia often looks like NOTHING has changed, but in reality EVERYTHING has changed! With dementia, it can feel like I'm choosing to do things to hurt others or to make life more difficult, but it might be that I simply can't get my brain to do the things it used to do so well.

What things make you HAPPY? I bet if I asked you this question throughout the years your answer would change as you age....
12/15/2020

What things make you HAPPY? I bet if I asked you this question throughout the years your answer would change as you age. As a child from playing outside, hanging out with friends, it would change to traveling and spending time with family as an adult.

People living with Dementia experience different stages of brain failure and the brain usually dies in the opposite way that it was developed. Although People living with Dementia usually lose safety and spatial awareness they always seem to keep Curiosity.

So as we walk with our loved ones try to remember that what they liked yesterday may be different then what they like today. It is okay and maybe even preferred to try new things and if things are not going the way you had hoped.....Let it Go!!! What you need is not always as important as what they need. 🤗

Let play guide you to happy engagement and let curiosity bring laughter to every experience.

Taking a "TIME OUT" is so important for everyone in all stages of life.  When supporting someone with Dementia and cogni...
12/13/2020

Taking a "TIME OUT" is so important for everyone in all stages of life. When supporting someone with Dementia and cognitive challenges it is something that we rarely get to do but is even more important. A "TIME OUT" will help a care partner's thinking ability and move from reacting to the situation to responding to the situation.
Steps to taking a "TIME OUT" in the moment
* Let the situation go
* Take 3 deep breathes
* Remember to be where they are in the moment
* Remember to change the process so you can change the outcome.
* Concentrate on the setting you are in and the care you are giving.

All of these steps will allow for a positive interaction between you and your loved one and ensure you are both successful in providing and receiving care.

Benefits of Recreation Therapy for Seniors *  Enhances Physical Health - Recreational therapy can help your senior loved...
12/10/2020

Benefits of Recreation Therapy for Seniors
* Enhances Physical Health - Recreational therapy can help your senior loved one overcome physical challenges due to past injuries or ill health.
* Boosts Cognitive Function - By finding the right set of activities for your aging loved one, a recreational therapist can support brain changes by increasing alertness, enhance problem-solving skills, and keep the brain stimulated.
* Increases Socialization - By reinforcing social interactions developing through leisure activities, your family member can diminish loneliness and depression.
* Manages Stress - Therapeutic recreation activities can elevate your loved one’s mood and emotional health by eliminating stress. By engaging in meaningful activities, your aging loved one can maintain a sense of purpose in life.

What is Therapeutic Recreation?Therapeutic Recreation/Recreation Therapy is a health profession that utilizes a therapeu...
12/08/2020

What is Therapeutic Recreation?

Therapeutic Recreation/Recreation Therapy is a health profession that utilizes a therapeutic process, involving leisure, recreation and play as a primary tool for each individual to optimize the health and well-being of individuals with illnesses and disabling conditions.

Recreation Therapists:
Work with individuals with physical, mental, emotional, cognitive or social limitations that impact their ability, attitude and motivation to engage freely in leisure and to maintain a healthy and balanced leisure lifestyle.

Work collaboratively within health service teams which may include physicians, psychiatrists, psychologists, nurses, nutritionists, occupational therapists, physical therapists, speech language pathologists and social workers.

Work in settings throughout the continuum of health care including acute care, rehabilitation, community, assisted living, day programs, long term care and private business.

Follow established Standards of Practice including assessment, intervention/care planning, program development and delivery, documentation, evaluation, research, professional development and community practice.
Alberta Therapeutic Recreation Association - ATRA https://www.alberta-tr.ca/

** By engaging your loved one in recreational therapy, you can help them stay healthy and active and live a full life at home. Paloma Seniors Care provides services and education to support these goals.

ATRA is an association founded in September 1985, representing over 600 professionals working in the field of Therapeutic Recreation in Alberta.

Understanding how Recreation Therapy can help some of the challenges in caring for your loved who has a diagnoses of Dem...
12/07/2020

Understanding how Recreation Therapy can help some of the challenges in caring for your loved who has a diagnoses of Dementia. Contact me to see how I can provide support for you and your family.
https://www.cbc.ca/radio/thecurrent/the-current-for-nov-30-2020-1.5819415/lisa-raitt-on-taking-care-of-her-husband-as-he-struggles-with-young-onset-alzheimer-s-1.5819424

Former MP Lisa Raitt discusses the daily reality of caring for her husband Bruce Wood, who was diagnosed with young-onset Alzheimer's in 2016 at age 56.

Where do you need support? Let me help you find what makes you happy!
12/07/2020

Where do you need support? Let me help you find what makes you happy!

12/06/2020

Welcome!!

PALOMA SENIORS CARE
Providing the tools you need to care for your loved ones at home.

Giving families the means to provide a Positive Care Approach in supporting their loved ones at home

Paloma Seniors Care understands the importance of aging at home. We are compassionate to care partners when their loved ones require additional care needs. As our population ages we provide support and education to families to better understand the challenges associated with aging.

12/06/2020

Address

Bonaventure Avenue
Edmonton, AB
T5E6R3

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