AgeWell Medical Associates, PC

We Care... At AgeWell Medical Associates, we want to be your first contact for all your healthcare needs, and are dedicated exclusively to primary care for adults 60 and older.

We partner with our patients for shared decision making regarding your care, provide quick and easy access to your healthcare team here at AgeWell, coordinate with your other healthcare providers to prevent duplicate, possibly unnecessary testing, and focus on preventive services as well as chronic condition management.

Operating as usual

07/08/2021
07/07/2021

Stress can interfere with your ability to AgeWell!! Talk to your primary care provider if you are experiencing increased stress. Remember there is also a Behavioral Health specialist available at AgeWell, Dr Kenny.

Stress can interfere with your ability to AgeWell!! Talk to your primary care provider if you are experiencing increased stress. Remember there is also a Behavioral Health specialist available at AgeWell, Dr Kenny.

07/06/2021

Yes it is💥💥💥

Yes it is💥💥💥

07/05/2021

Enjoy the extended holiday weekend 🇺🇸

Enjoy the extended holiday weekend 🇺🇸

07/04/2021

Happy Independence Day 🇺🇸💥🇺🇸💥🇺🇸

Happy Independence Day 🇺🇸💥🇺🇸💥🇺🇸

07/03/2021
07/02/2021
07/01/2021

Thankful Thursday❣️

Thankful Thursday❣️

06/30/2021

If you are Diabetic, check with your primary care provider at AgeWell first!

If you are Diabetic, check with your primary care provider at AgeWell first!

06/29/2021

Thoughtful Tuesday 😊

Thoughtful Tuesday 😊

[06/28/21]   If you have a concern about headaches, call for an appointment with your primary care provider at AgeWell.

Headache Basics
Medically Reviewed by Jennifer Robinson, MD on September 14, 2020
Headaches can be more complicated than most people realize. Different kinds can have their own set of symptoms, happen for unique reasons, and need different treatments.Once you know the type of headache you have, you and your doctor can find the treatment that’s most likely to help and even try to prevent them.

Common Types of Headaches
There are over 150 types of headaches, but the most common types include:
Tension Headaches
Tension headaches are the most common type of headache among adults and teens. They cause mild to moderate pain and come and go over time. They usually have no other symptoms.
Migraine Headaches:
Migraine headaches are often described as pounding, throbbing pain. They can last from 4 hours to 3 days and usually happen one to four times a month. Along with the pain, people have other symptoms, such as sensitivity to light, noise, or smells; nausea or vomiting; loss of appetite; and upset stomach or belly pain. When a child has a migraine, they may look pale, feel dizzy, and have blurry vision, fever, and an upset stomach. A small number of children's migraines include digestive symptoms, like vomiting, that happen about once a month.
Cluster Headaches:
These headaches are the most severe. You could have intense burning or piercing pain behind or around one eye. It can be throbbing or constant. The pain can be so bad that most people with cluster headaches can’t sit still and will often pace during an attack. On the side of the pain, the eyelid droops, the eye reddens, pupil gets smaller, or the eye makes tears. The nostril on that side runs or stuffs up. They’re called cluster headaches because they tend to happen in groups. You might get them one to three times per day during a cluster period, which may last 2 weeks to 3 months. Each headache attack lasts 15 minutes to 3 hours. They can wake you up from sleep. The headaches may disappear completely (your doctor will call this remission) for months or years, only to come back later. Men are three to four times more likely to get them than women.
Chronic Daily Headaches:
If you have this type of headache 15 days or more a month for longer than 3 months. Some are short. Others last more than 4 hours. It’s usually one of the four types of primary headache:
Chronic migraine
Chronic tension headache
New daily persistent headache
Hemicrania continua

Sinus Headaches:
Sinus headaches, you feel a deep and constant pain in your cheekbones, forehead, or on the bridge of your nose. They happen when cavities in your head, called sinuses, get inflamed. The pain usually comes along with other sinus symptoms, like a runny nose, fullness in the ears, fever, and a swollen face. A true sinus headache results from a sinus infection so the gunk that comes out of your nose will be yellow or green, unlike the clear discharge in cluster or migraine headaches.

Posttraumatic HeadachesPosttraumatic stress headaches usually start 2-3 days after a head injury. You’ll feel:
A dull ache that gets worse from time to time
Vertigo
Lightheadedness
Trouble concentrating
Memory problems
Tiring quickly
Irritability
Headaches may last for a few months. But if it doesn’t get better within a couple of weeks, call your doctor.

Less Common Headaches

Exercise Headaches: When you’re active, the muscles in your head, neck, and scalp need more blood. Your blood vessels swell to supply them. The result is a pulsing pain on both sides of your head that can last anywhere from 5 minutes to 48 hours. It usually hits while you’re active or just afterward, whether the activity is exercise or s*x.
Hemicrania Continua
This headache is a chronic, ongoing headache almost always affects the same side of your face and head. Other symptoms include:
Pain that varies in severity
Red or teary eyes
Runny or stuffy nose
Droopy eyelid
Contracted iris
Responds to the pain medication indomethacin
Worse pain with physical activity
Worse pain with drinking alcohol headache almost always affects the same side of your face and head. Other symptoms include:
Pain that varies in severity
Red or teary eyes
Runny or stuffy nose
Droopy eyelid
Contracted iris
Responds to the pain medication indomethacin
Worse pain with physical activity
Worse pain with drinking alcohol.
Some people also notice migraine symptoms like:
Nausea and vomiting
Sensitivity to light and sound
There are two types:
Chronic: You have daily headaches.
Remitting: You have headaches for 6 months. They go away for a period of weeks or months and come back.

Hormone Headaches
You can get headaches from shifting hormone levels during your periods, pregnancy, and menopause. The hormone changes from birth control pills and hormone replacement therapy can also trigger headaches. When they happen 2 days before your period or in the first 3 days after it starts, they’re called menstrual migraines.

New Daily Persistent Headaches (NDPH)These may start suddenly and can go on for 3 months or longer. Many people clearly remember the day their pain began.Doctors aren't sure why this type of headache starts. Some people find that it strikes after an infection, flu-like illness, surgery, or stressful event.
The pain tends to be moderate, but for some people, it's severe. And it's often hard to treat.Symptoms can vary widely. Some are like tension headaches. Others share symptoms of migraine, such as nausea or sensitivity to light.Call your doctor if your headache won't go away or if it's severe.

Rebound Headaches:
You might also hear these called medication overuse headaches. If you use a prescription or over-the-counter pain reliever more than two or three times a week, or more than 10 days a month, you’re setting yourself up for more pain. When the meds wear off, the pain comes back and you have to take more to stop it. This can cause a dull, constant headache that’s often worse in the morning.

Rare Headaches

Ice Pick HeadachesThese short, stabbing, intense headaches usually only last a few seconds. They might happen a few times a day at most. If you have one, see the doctor. Ice pick headaches can be a condition on their own, or they can be a symptom of something else.
Spinal Headaches:
Talk to your doctor if you get a headache after you have a spinal tap, a spinal block, or an epidural. Your doctor might call it a puncture headache because these procedures involve piercing the membrane that surrounds your spinal cord. If spinal fluid leaks through the puncture site, it can cause a headache.

Thunderclap Headaches:
People often call this the worst headache of your life. It comes suddenly out of nowhere and peaks quickly. Causes of thunderclap headaches include:
Blood vessel tear, rupture, or blockage
Head injury
Hemorrhagic stroke from a ruptured blood vessel in your brain
Ischemic stroke from a blocked blood vessel in your brain
Narrowed blood vessels surrounding the brain
Inflamed blood vessels
Blood pressure changes in late pregnancy
Take a sudden new headache seriously. It’s often the only warning sign you get of a serious problem.

What Causes Headaches?

The pain you feel during a headache comes from a mix of signals between your brain, blood vessels, and nearby nerves. Specific nerves in your blood vessels and head muscles switch on and send pain signals to your brain. But it isn’t clear how these signals get turned on in the first place.Common causes of headaches include:
Illness:
This can include infections, colds, and fevers. Headaches are also common with conditions like sinusitis (inflammation of the sinuses), a throat infection, or an ear infection. In some cases, headaches can result from a blow to the head or, rarely, a sign of a more serious medical problem.
Stress.
Emotional stress and depression as well as alcohol use, skipping meals, changes in sleep patterns, and taking too much medication.
Other causes include neck or back strain due to poor posture.
Your environment:
Including secondhand to***co smoke, strong smells from household chemicals or perfumes, allergens, and certain foods. Stress, pollution, noise, lighting, and weather changes are other possible triggers.
Genetics: Headaches, especially migraine headaches, tend to run in families. Most children and teens (90%) who have migraines have other family members who get them. When both parents have a history of migraines, there is a 70% chance their child will also have them. If only one parent has a history of these headaches, the risk drops to 25%-50%.

Getting a Diagnosis

Once you get your headaches diagnosed correctly, you can start the right treatment plan for your symptoms.The first step is to talk to your doctor about your headaches. They’ll give you a physical exam and ask you about the symptoms you have and how often they happen. It’s important to be as complete as possible with these descriptions. Give your doctor a list of things that cause your headaches, things that make them worse, and what helps you feel better. You can track details in a headache diary to help your doctor diagnose your problem.

Most people don’t need special diagnostic tests. But sometimes, doctors suggest a CT scan or MRI to look for problems inside your brain that might cause your headaches. Skull X-rays won’t help. An EEG (electroencephalogram) is also unnecessary unless you’ve passed out when you had a headache.If your headache symptoms get worse or happen more often despite treatment, ask your doctor to refer you to a headache specialist.

Source: Web MD

06/28/2021

Sorry, late post! Hope you all had a good Sunday!

Sorry, late post! Hope you all had a good Sunday!

06/26/2021

Some daisies to brighten a dreary day!

Some daisies to brighten a dreary day!

06/26/2021

Sorry, late post! Busy day 😊

Sorry, late post! Busy day 😊

06/24/2021

Thankful Thursday!!

Thankful Thursday!!

06/23/2021

🥱😴🤤 10 Tips for better sleep!

🥱😴🤤 10 Tips for better sleep!

06/22/2021
06/21/2021

Was actually yesterday but Father’s Day was more important 🌞🏖😎

Was actually yesterday but Father’s Day was more important 🌞🏖😎

06/20/2021
06/19/2021

Enjoy your Saturday!

Enjoy your Saturday!

06/18/2021

😂😂😂

😂😂😂

06/17/2021
06/16/2021

The competent, caring health care providers at AgeWell will partner with you to achieve and maintain optimal health!
Bottom row: Left to Right
Paula Hardy NP-C, Jeffrey Kulp MD, Katrina Grablin PA-C
Top row: Left to Right
Mike Kenny PhD, Whitney Paul NP-C,
Lisa Foster NP-C, Brad Bingham NP-C

The competent, caring health care providers at AgeWell will partner with you to achieve and maintain optimal health!
Bottom row: Left to Right
Paula Hardy NP-C, Jeffrey Kulp MD, Katrina Grablin PA-C
Top row: Left to Right
Mike Kenny PhD, Whitney Paul NP-C,
Lisa Foster NP-C, Brad Bingham NP-C

06/15/2021
06/14/2021

Happy Flag Day 🇺🇸❤️🇺🇸🤍🇺🇸💙🇺🇸

Happy Flag Day 🇺🇸❤️🇺🇸🤍🇺🇸💙🇺🇸

06/13/2021
06/12/2021
06/11/2021
06/10/2021
06/09/2021

Self care, both physical and mental will help you AgeWell!

Self care, both physical and mental will help you AgeWell!

Photos from AgeWell Medical Associates, PC's post 06/08/2021

Exciting day at AgeWell yesterday! Celebrating the birthdays of our beloved leader Dr Kulp and our awesome behavioral health provider Dr Kenny! 🥳🎂🎈🎁🎉💌🥳

[06/07/21]   Home Safety for Seniors

With a growing number of older adults living independently, it’s increasingly important to make sure that they’re safe at home. Falls, burns, and poisonings are among the most common accidents involving older people. Older adults who live alone may also become the victims of criminals who target older people. If you’re an older adult living on your own, or care for an older person living alone, here’s what you need to do to stay safe.

Keep emergency numbers handy
Always keep a list of emergency numbers by each phone. Write this information in large enough print that you can read it easily if you are in a hurry or frightened. Be sure to list numbers for:

911
Poison Control: 1-800-222-1222
Family member or friend to call in case of emergency
Healthcare provider’s office

Prevent falls
If you have difficulty with walking or balance, or have fallen in the past year, talk to your healthcare provider about having a special falls risk assessment.
Ask your provider if you would benefit from an exercise program to prevent falls.
If you have fallen before, or are scared of falling, think about buying a special alarm that you wear as a bracelet or necklace. Then, if you fall and can’t get to the phone, you can push a button on the alarm that will call emergency services for you.
Don't rush to answer the phone. Many people fall trying to answer the phone. Either carry a cordless or cell phone or let an answering machine pick up.
When walking on smooth floors, wear non-slip footwear, such as slippers with rubber/no-slip bottoms or flat, thin-soled shoes that fit well.
If you have a cane or a walker, use it at all times instead of holding onto walls and furniture.

Safety-proof your home
Make sure all hallways, stairs, and paths are well lit and clear of objects such as books or shoes.
Use rails and banisters when going up and down the stairs. Never place scatter rugs at the bottom or top of stairs.
Tape all area rugs to the floor so they do not move when you walk on them.
Protect against fire and related dangers

If there is a fire in your home, don't try to put it out. Leave and call 911. Know at least two ways to get out of your apartment or home.
When you're cooking, don't wear loose clothes or clothes with long sleeves
Replace appliances that have fraying or damaged electrical cords.
Don't put too many electric cords into one socket or extension cord.
Install a smoke detector and replace the battery twice a year.
Never smoke in bed or leave candles burning, even for a short time, in an empty room.
Make sure heaters are at least 3 feet away from anything that can burn, such as curtains, bedding, or furniture. Turn off space heaters when you leave the room.

Avoid bathroom hazards
Set the thermostat on the water heater no higher than 120° F to prevent scalding.
Have grab bars installed in the shower and near the toilet to make getting around easier and safer.
Put rubber mats in the bathtub to prevent slipping.
If you are having a hard time getting in and out of your tub, or on and off the toilet, ask your provider to help you get a special tub chair or bench or raised toilet seat.

Prevent poisoning
Carbon Monoxide
Never try to heat your home with your stove, oven, or grill since these can give off carbon monoxide--a deadly gas that you cannot see or smell.
Make sure there is a carbon monoxide detector near all bedrooms, and be sure to test and replace the battery two times a year.

Medications
Keep all medications in their original containers so you don't mix up medicines.
Ask your pharmacist to put large-print labels on your medications to make them easier to read.
Take your medications in a well-lit room, so you can see the labels.
Bring all of your pill bottles with you to your healthcare provider's appointments so he or she can look at them and make sure you are taking them correctly.

Cleaning products
Never mix bleach, ammonia, or other cleaning liquids together when you are cleaning. When mixed, cleaning liquids can create deadly gases.

Protect against abuse
Keep your windows and doors locked at all times.
Never let a stranger into your home when you are there alone.
Talk over offers made by telephone salespeople with a friend or family member.
Do not share your personal information, such as social security number, credit card, bank information, or account passwords, with people you do not know who contact you.
Always ask for written information about any offers, prizes, or charities and wait to respond until you have reviewed the information thoroughly.
Do not let yourself be pressured into making purchases, signing contracts, or making donations. It is never rude to wait and discuss the plans with a family member or friend.

Source: Health in Aging

06/06/2021

Thank you for your service and sacrifice
🇺🇸❤️🇺🇸🤍🇺🇸💙🇺🇸

Thank you for your service and sacrifice
🇺🇸❤️🇺🇸🤍🇺🇸💙🇺🇸

06/05/2021

Location

Category

Telephone

Address


2350 International Circle
Colorado Springs, CO
80910

Opening Hours

Monday 8am - 4:30pm
Tuesday 8am - 4:30pm
Wednesday 8am - 4:30pm
Thursday 8am - 4:30pm
Friday 8am - 4:30pm
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