Sepsis Alliance

Sepsis Alliance We work to save lives and reduce suffering by improving sepsis awareness and care.
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Last summer, 27-year-old Tirzah developed a urinary tract infection that persisted for months despite multiple rounds of...
07/22/2024

Last summer, 27-year-old Tirzah developed a urinary tract infection that persisted for months despite multiple rounds of antibiotics. Her symptoms intensified to include chills, nausea, extreme fatigue, and intense back pain.

In the emergency room, she learned that the UTI led to a kidney infection that had now progressed to sepsis. She spent a week in the hospital undergoing treatment to combat the infection.

She shares, “The gravity of the situation hit me hard when I learned the full extent of what I had been through, and the realization that I could have lost my life. Navigating the aftermath of such a harrowing ordeal has left me anxious about the possibility of another urinary tract infection escalating to a similar dangerous level. However, I am grateful for surviving the ordeal, and grateful sepsis was caught early. I hope that sharing my story and raising awareness underscores the importance of being proactive about health and never taking it for granted.”

Read more of Tirzah’s story below. To share your experience, visit sepsisalliance.info/FacesOfSepsis.

For three long months, I battled a persistent urinary tract infection (UTI) that refused to go away, despite multiple rounds of antibiotics. (Sepsis and

Doctors at Presbyterian St. Luke’s Medical Center in Denver are seeing an unexplained uptick in the number of obstetrics...
07/21/2024

Doctors at Presbyterian St. Luke’s Medical Center in Denver are seeing an unexplained uptick in the number of obstetrics patients with strep A infections that progress to sepsis.

Dr. Kiersten Williams, an OB hospitalist at the facility, recently explained that the complication had previously been so rare that doctors may not diagnose it right away and she wants to raise awareness about symptoms. “If your pain is not getting better, if you’re getting a fever, don’t sit on it, don’t blow it off — get seen,” she urges.

Read the full article below.

Denver doctors are seeing an unexplained uptick in the number of obstetrics patients with strep A sepsis, a life-threatening condition that can cause organ failure.

Group B strep infections aren’t just a threat to newborn babies. These infections can also cause serious complications, ...
07/19/2024

Group B strep infections aren’t just a threat to newborn babies. These infections can also cause serious complications, like sepsis, for older people, and those with certain chronic illnesses, like diabetes.

Learn more this Group B Strep Awareness Month by visiting sepsisalliance.info/GBS.

Thank you to Sepsis Survivor and Sepsis Awareness Advocate Jackie Duda for securing a 2024 Sepsis Awareness Month procla...
07/18/2024

Thank you to Sepsis Survivor and Sepsis Awareness Advocate Jackie Duda for securing a 2024 Sepsis Awareness Month proclamation for the state of Maryland!

Jackie survived sepsis after a colon perforation progressed to the life-threatening condition and nearly took her life. She now works to raise awareness in her community and ensure that others are knowledgeable about the signs and symptoms of sepsis.

“What motivates me to request this proclamation each year is the gratitude I have for still being alive and the desire to help others survive sepsis, which I believe can be helped through awareness campaigns and education,” Jackie explains. “As a former teacher I still love to educate others, it's a passion of mine, along with writing articles about sepsis.”

Will you join Jackie and ask your governor to recognize September as Sepsis Awareness Month in your state? Learn how to connect with governors in just a few simple clicks by visiting sepsisalliance.info/SAMProclamations2024.

Sepsis is the leading cause of death in U.S. hospitals, and early detection can provide patients with their best chance ...
07/16/2024

Sepsis is the leading cause of death in U.S. hospitals, and early detection can provide patients with their best chance for survival and recovery. Do you know how to spot the signs?

Learn why It’s About TIME ™ by visiting sepsisalliance.info/Symptoms.

The day after Kelsi gave birth to her son, she developed shortness of breath. Within 24 hours, she’d also developed an i...
07/15/2024

The day after Kelsi gave birth to her son, she developed shortness of breath. Within 24 hours, she’d also developed an increased heart rate and drop in blood pressure. Doctors determined that Kelsi’s uterus was infected, and she had streptococcal toxic shock syndrome that caused severe septic shock.

Her medical team informed her husband that she likely only had a few hours to live. They rushed her into surgery to undergo a complete hysterectomy, and then airlifted her to a different hospital where she was placed on ECMO. “I was in heart, renal, respiratory, and liver failure with my heart only working at less than five percent,” Kelsi recalls. “My mortality risk was very high, and no one was very optimistic that I would make it out.”

She continues, “I finally and miraculously woke up March 31, 2023. I will never forget the cardiologist who came in with his eyes watery who smiled and said, ‘we didn’t think we’d ever get to see you awake.’ It was so surreal hearing everything. Last I remembered I was getting a CT and fell asleep.”

Read more of Kelsi’s story below. To share your experience, visit sepsisalliance.info/FacesOfSepsis.

Thursday, March 23rd 2023 I gave birth to my fourth son. Everything went well and it was a normal delivery. Friday, March 24 I started experiencing

Do you want to see Sepsis Awareness Month officially recognized in your state? There are only 50 days left to submit a r...
07/13/2024

Do you want to see Sepsis Awareness Month officially recognized in your state? There are only 50 days left to submit a request to your governor to make that proclamation before the annual observance kicks off on September 1!

In just a few simple clicks, you can tell your local leaders about the importance of raising sepsis awareness. Can we count on you to help get September proclaimed Sepsis Awareness Month in your state?

Visit sepsisalliance.info/SAMProclamations2024 to learn how to contact your governor’s office today! If you’ve already requested and received a 2024 proclamation from your governor’s office, please let us know by emailing [email protected].

Did you receive timely and knowledgeable EMS care when you had sepsis? The care that EMS personnel provide can lead to f...
07/11/2024

Did you receive timely and knowledgeable EMS care when you had sepsis?

The care that EMS personnel provide can lead to faster sepsis treatment times in the emergency department. In fact, transport by EMS decreased the time to antibiotic administration by 24% and decreased the time to receiving IV fluids by 50%.

The more EMS personnel know about sepsis symptoms and recognition, the better equipped they’ll be to provide potentially life-saving care. Learn more and access free educational materials that you can share in your community at sepsis.org.

For sepsis survivors and the loved ones who have supported them during treatment and recovery, anything from a certain s...
07/10/2024

For sepsis survivors and the loved ones who have supported them during treatment and recovery, anything from a certain smell to an upcoming medical procedure can bring them back to their very worst moments.

Join this upcoming conversation to learn how triggers work and what their relationship is to trauma, hear examples from both survivors and loved ones, and discover strategies for those who experience these stressful symptoms.

Don’t have a Sepsis Alliance Connect account yet? Membership is FREE and required to access live virtual sessions like this one. Registration can take up to 48 hours to process. Learn more and start your registration today at SepsisConnect.org.

In May, high school volleyball player Charlotte Vinson developed common strep throat symptoms including body aches, a so...
07/09/2024

In May, high school volleyball player Charlotte Vinson developed common strep throat symptoms including body aches, a sore throat, and a fever. Her parents took her to the doctor, and she was soon airlifted to the nearby children’s hospital due to her rapidly deteriorating condition.

When Charlotte arrived, doctors determined that she was battling an invasive Strep A infection that had progressed to septic shock. She was placed on ECMO for more than a week, as well as a ventilator and dialysis.

Now, her family is reminding others to pay attention to the health of people they love. “Recognizing that sepsis is something that happens, and it can happen to people who are young and healthy,” Charlotte’s mother shares.

“Know your body well,” Charlotte adds. “Because a lot of people don't, and not being afraid to be like, ‘Hey, this is wrong. I do need help.’”

Full Article: https://www.wthr.com/article/news/local/yorktown-teen-charlotte-vinson-survives-septic-shock-from-common-bacteria-strep-a-riley-hospital-volleyball/531-b0e5fda1-a9a6-4680-be2a-1ccdc24c5dcc

Did you know that, in addition to the 270,000 in-hospital sepsis deaths that occur in the United States each year, there...
07/08/2024

Did you know that, in addition to the 270,000 in-hospital sepsis deaths that occur in the United States each year, there are also an estimated 80,000 sepsis deaths of individuals who are released to hospice?

This is more than those who die from stroke, prostate cancer, breast cancer, and opioid overdose combined.

Get the facts on sepsis by downloading our collection of informative fact sheets at sepsisalliance.info/FactSheets.

Healthcare workers are on the frontlines in the fight against sepsis – and they’re also on the frontlines of our advocac...
07/07/2024

Healthcare workers are on the frontlines in the fight against sepsis – and they’re also on the frontlines of our advocacy efforts to raise sepsis awareness! Team members from Saint Francis Health System in Oklahoma reached out to their governor to explain the importance of a Sepsis Awareness Month proclamation. Thank you for your advocacy on behalf of Sepsis Alliance!

Learn how to connect with the governor of your state to submit your request at sepsisalliance.info/SAMProclamations2024.

07/05/2024

What is sepsis?

Whether you’ve survived sepsis, worked in sepsis care, or lost a loved one to sepsis, you’re likely all-too-familiar with this question. Alarmingly, many individuals are still not aware of this deadly condition.

Our “What is Sepsis?” educational video helps break down how sepsis is triggered within the body, what the lasting effects of sepsis can look like, and much more. Will you share this clip from our video to help us raise life-saving sepsis awareness?

Watch the full video at https://youtu.be/oUgiphTsAS0.

Although the entire Mayer family came down with the flu over spring break, 10-year-old Kennedy’s condition continued to ...
07/03/2024

Although the entire Mayer family came down with the flu over spring break, 10-year-old Kennedy’s condition continued to deteriorate while her parents and sibling slowly improved. On Easter, she started experiencing a fever, chills, vomiting and complained of pain and pressure on her eye. Her family took her to her pediatrician where they were told to get Kennedy to the emergency room immediately.

In the ER, Kennedy had alarmingly low blood pressure and a rapid heart rate. Doctors informed her family that she was in septic shock and would need to be transferred to a local children’s hospital. Once she was transferred, her medical team made another discovery: Kennedy also had necrotizing fasciitis, a flesh-eating bacterial infection in her eye.

“When I began treating her, she was probably the sickest child in the hospital at that time and maybe the sickest kid in the state,” her physician, Kristen Ann Smith, MD., M.S., shares.

Read more about Kennedy’s recovery below.

Taylor Swift fan recovers from flesh eating bacteria with help from her care team and Swift's music

Group B strep bacteria, commonly found in your intestines and lower gastrointestinal tract, can cause serious complicati...
07/02/2024

Group B strep bacteria, commonly found in your intestines and lower gastrointestinal tract, can cause serious complications for newborns. In fact, GBS infections are a leading cause of sepsis in newborns according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Learn more this Group B Strep Awareness Month by visiting sepsisalliance.info/GBS.

Group B Strep International

Have you heard? This year’s Sepsis Alliance Summit will offer a third day of free and virtual sepsis education! We’re ex...
07/01/2024

Have you heard? This year’s Sepsis Alliance Summit will offer a third day of free and virtual sepsis education! We’re excited to share that Sepsis Alliance is joining forces with Sepsis Forum for an additional day of learning focused on global sepsis viewpoints.

If you’re ready to explore sepsis identification, diagnosis, and treatment with us during the 5th Annual Sepsis Alliance Summit on September 25-27, visit SepsisSummit.org to register today.

When thirty-five-year-old ICU nurse Lindsey developed extreme pain and vomiting, she sought emergency medical attention....
06/30/2024

When thirty-five-year-old ICU nurse Lindsey developed extreme pain and vomiting, she sought emergency medical attention. “I have taken care of many patients in septic shock,” she explains. “Yet when I was sent home from two ERs with a ‘just a virus’ diagnosis, I didn’t think much of it. I was the sickest I had ever been, but if they thought I was okay? I must be.”

As Lindsey’s condition continued to deteriorate at home, her husband called 911. “The 3rd ER recognized what was happening immediately,” she recalls. “They called it what it was: septic shock. I had nurses swarming over me and I was wheeled into the biggest room they had.” She was admitted to the ICU, placed on a BiPAP, and sedated for several days.

Doctors ultimately discovered that Lindsey had an invasive group A strep infection that rapidly progressed to septic shock. She now shares, “I know I am incredibly fortunate to have survived my hospitalization relatively unscathed. While I still have some flashbacks, I am determined to be an advocate for everyone to recognize sepsis for what it is - a dangerous condition that needs to be acted upon quickly.”

Read more of Lindsey’s story below. To share your experience, visit sepsisalliance.info/FacesOfSepsis.

I’m 35 and have been an ICU nurse for 13 years. I have taken care of many patients in septic shock. Yet when I was sent home from two ERs with a “just a

Post-sepsis life often has challenges, especially if you’re a survivor who has been left with long-term effects of your ...
06/28/2024

Post-sepsis life often has challenges, especially if you’re a survivor who has been left with long-term effects of your illness. Some sepsis survivors recover completely and resume their lives, while others may struggle to cope – something no one expected.

If you’re one of these sepsis survivors, it’s important to know that you are not alone. Access our collection of free educational resources for sepsis survivors and loved ones at sepsisalliance.info/LifeAfterSepsis.

Did you know that our website offers educational resources in a variety of different languages? Sepsis Alliance believes...
06/27/2024

Did you know that our website offers educational resources in a variety of different languages? Sepsis Alliance believes that the tools and information we provide should be accessible to everyone – regardless of their preferred reading language. Access and download these resources for free at sepsisalliance.info/MultiLanguageResources.

We’re thrilled to share that Texas has officially proclaimed September as Sepsis Awareness Month! Sepsis Survivor Julia ...
06/25/2024

We’re thrilled to share that Texas has officially proclaimed September as Sepsis Awareness Month!

Sepsis Survivor Julia is one of many advocates in the state who reached out to Governor Abbott to encourage him to make this important declaration.

“Though I still face the long-lasting effects of sepsis, I am grateful for every breath I take,” she shares. “I channel my experience into advocating for sepsis awareness, determined to prevent others from enduring what I went through. My hope is that by sharing my story, I can empower others to be proactive about their health and create a meaningful impact in the fight against this silent and deadly condition.”

Are you ready to raise your voice for sepsis awareness, just like Julia? Learn how to connect with the governor of your state to submit your request at sepsisalliance.info/SAMProclamations2024.

➡️ Over 350,000 U.S. adults killed each year.  ➡️ The leading cause of death in U.S. hospitals.➡️ Over 49 million people...
06/24/2024

➡️ Over 350,000 U.S. adults killed each year.

➡️ The leading cause of death in U.S. hospitals.

➡️ Over 49 million people worldwide affected each year.

𝗧𝗵𝗶𝘀 𝗶𝘀 𝘀𝗲𝗽𝘀𝗶𝘀.

Are you ready to better identify, diagnose, and treat this deadly condition in your practice? Mortality increases by as much as 9% for every hour that treatment is delayed. YOU can help save lives and limbs by learning more about current sepsis recommendations and guidelines at the 5th Annual Sepsis Alliance Summit on September 25-27, 2024.

Register today for this free virtual conference and learn more about earning RN CE credits for most sessions at SepsisSummit.org.

In April, twenty-eight-year-old Joe DuPont noticed red blotches along his neck, chest, and other parts of his body. He i...
06/23/2024

In April, twenty-eight-year-old Joe DuPont noticed red blotches along his neck, chest, and other parts of his body. He initially thought it was some type of skin irritation, but when the areas failed to heal and began to fill with fluid, Joe went to the hospital.

Doctors attributed Joe’s symptoms to a skin infection coupled with anxiety, prescribed antibiotics, and sent him back home. Less than 24 hours later, however, Joe experienced chest pain, blurred vision, fever, and an irregular heartbeat. He rushed back to the ER where it was determined Joe had developed sepsis.

“I've been healthy pretty much my entire adult life,” he explains now. “I just never expected I could go through something like this, and I think it's important that people are aware that this can happen.”

Joe DuPont, 28, from California, went into sepsis earlier this year after doctors mistook his symptoms for a skin infection and anxiety. He is now working to raise awareness of the illness.

In February, Sarah began experiencing stomach pain and vomiting. She reassured her daughter, Mary, that she would be fin...
06/21/2024

In February, Sarah began experiencing stomach pain and vomiting. She reassured her daughter, Mary, that she would be fine, and she eventually fell asleep. When Mary checked on her mother the following day and noticed she was still sleeping, she figured Sarah was simply exhausted from the previous evening.

“Thirty minutes later, a loud thud came from the room,” Mary recalls. “I found her on the floor gasping for air, pouring sweat, clammy skin and bluish around her mouth. I supported her trying to keep her awake and screamed for my boyfriend to call 911. She was in and out of consciousness, and quickly declining. I was prepared to do whatever I could to save my mother, my best friend, and the person I spent every day with.”

At the hospital, doctors told Mary that her mother was facing life-threatening sepsis. They placed Sarah in a medically induced coma and intubated her. “We took turns in and out of her room, all day in hopes of a miracle,” Mary continues. “That next morning, the third day of her admission, we were greeted with even more devastating news that overnight her condition got worse. She was in multi-organ failure and breathing almost completely by intubation with no sign of life left in her anywhere.”

“We decided it was best to get her comfortable, take the machines off and let her rest,” Mary shares. “I have no words on how incredibly painful that was, as I am 33 years old and never failed to recognize how much I still needed my mom with me. Sepsis took my mother in a 4-day period, with no prior symptoms. I miss her every day and hope that this tribute to her will somehow bring peace to another person reading it.”

Read more of Mary’s tribute to Sarah story below.

Sarah started her February 16, Friday morning babysitting her youngest grandson for a few hours while my sister had to work. She noticed her stomach was

Did you know that the majority of post-sepsis hospitalizations are infection-related? It’s important to remember the cri...
06/20/2024

Did you know that the majority of post-sepsis hospitalizations are infection-related? It’s important to remember the critical role that infection prevention measures can play in helping to prevent sepsis.

Learn more at sepsisalliance.info/Prevention.

Today, as we recognize Juneteenth, Sepsis Alliance remains committed to helping achieve a more just nation for all. Raci...
06/19/2024

Today, as we recognize Juneteenth, Sepsis Alliance remains committed to helping achieve a more just nation for all.

Racial equity and justice in healthcare matter. That’s why sepsis care equity is a major focus of our work and achieving it a key measure of our success. We aim to help close preventable gaps in sepsis outcomes across racial and ethnic lines and to do our part to lessen the disproportionate burden of sepsis on communities of color, and specifically Black communities.

To learn more about our commitment, visit HealthEquityPledge.org.

Sepsis often leaves survivors and loved ones wondering “why?”, when the reality is that many will never know. Despite th...
06/18/2024

Sepsis often leaves survivors and loved ones wondering “why?”, when the reality is that many will never know. Despite this challenge, some survivors come out on the other side feeling strong, resilient, and courageous.

Join our upcoming Sepsis Alliance Connect session to learn more about coping strategies ranging from mindfulness and meditation to yoga and journaling and how these tools have helped other survivors embrace post-sepsis life.

Don’t have a Sepsis Alliance Connect account yet? Membership is FREE and required to access live virtual sessions like this one. Registration can take up to 48 hours to process. Learn more and start your registration today at SepsisConnect.org.

Although most sepsis cases originate in the community, there are still a significant number of healthcare–acquired infec...
06/17/2024

Although most sepsis cases originate in the community, there are still a significant number of healthcare–acquired infections (HAIs) that can lead to sepsis - and these types have increased dramatically since the COVID–19 pandemic. In fact, it’s estimated that one out of every 31 people who spend time in a hospital will get a healthcare-acquired infection.

To learn more about healthcare-acquired infections and sepsis, visit http://sepsisalliance.info/HAIs.

Kentucky mom Lucinda “Cindy” Mullins took her first steps in prosthetics earlier this week and celebrated the milestone ...
06/16/2024

Kentucky mom Lucinda “Cindy” Mullins took her first steps in prosthetics earlier this week and celebrated the milestone on social media. Mullins underwent a quadruple amputation last December after a routine procedure to remove kidney stones led to an infection and septic shock.

“I have hard days. There are definitely very hard days where I just want to sleep or cry or feel sorry for myself,” she shares. “But there are more good days than those that are bad days.”

Kentucky mom of two Lucinda “Cindy” Mullins has taken her first steps using a brand new pair of prosthetic legs after losing both her arms and legs to a rare sepsis infection following a routine el…

Prompt recognition and treatment are key to saving lives and limbs from sepsis – a misdiagnosis can cost a patient valua...
06/14/2024

Prompt recognition and treatment are key to saving lives and limbs from sepsis – a misdiagnosis can cost a patient valuable and potentially life-saving time. In fact, the risk of mortality from sepsis increases by as much as 9% for every hour treatment is delayed.

Learn more at sepsis.org.

When Susan, a special education teacher with a history of diverticulosis, began to feel unwell at work one day, she aler...
06/13/2024

When Susan, a special education teacher with a history of diverticulosis, began to feel unwell at work one day, she alerted a colleague and the school nurse called an ambulance. At the hospital, doctors determined that Susan’s bowel had perforated that morning. Within 24 hours of being admitted, her condition further deteriorated, and she developed septic shock.

“I spent the first year physically healing, it has taken me an additional two years to mentally deal with the trauma, and the loss of a career, independence, etc.,” Susan explains. “I was diagnosed with PTSD, depression, and anxiety. It was about this time I found out about post sepsis syndrome. What a relief! There is a reason why I am not bouncing back.”

“My advice, keep seeking care,” she continues. “Just because you may look okay on the outside, means nothing. The trauma rocked myself and my family, the school, my friends, etc. Keep the faith!”

Read more of Susan’s story below. To share your experience, visit sepsisalliance.info/FacesOfSepsis.

The Day I went missing. November 24, 2020 was the last day before Thanksgiving Break from high school. I am a 62 yr. old female, entering my 18th year of

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