Nicole Cruz RD

Nicole Cruz RD Diet-free family nutrition. Helping you & your child have a healthy relationship with food 🥑🧁🍒
(2)

Talking to our kids about making “better” choices likely won’t help them make “better” choices.⁠⁠Instead, it’s more like...
02/19/2024

Talking to our kids about making “better” choices likely won’t help them make “better” choices.⁠

Instead, it’s more likely for them to just feel guilty about what they are eating. ⁠

And guilt and shame don’t help kids change their behavior. It just makes them feel bad about themselves and will potentially lead to disordered eating. ⁠

Instead, kids need a supportive eating environment that allows them to eat a variety, attune to their body cuts, and self-regulate. ⁠

To do this, grab my free guide: 5 Keys to Raise an Intuitive Eater. from this link: https://guides.nicolecruzrd.com/intuitiveeater

3 Responses I often hear when discussing how using negative language isn’t helpful for a child’s healthy relationship to...
02/16/2024

3 Responses I often hear when discussing how using negative language isn’t helpful for a child’s healthy relationship to food.

I know it can be so hard to not view some foods negatively, especially given the culture we live in.

There are constant messages about:
👉Eat this/ not that
👉How to make healthy versions
👉Junk food
👉Red light, yellow light, green light
👉Bad, processed foods
👉Dangers of sugar

The list of fear-mongering negative food messaging could go on and on…

So it’s no wonder that you might view some foods as bad or ‘junk’ or ‘crap’. At least that’s what I hear from a lot of my clients.

And when I’m working with parents who are trying to help their child have a healthy relationship with food, they often say… “All they want is junk!” Or… “They just ate crap all weekend!”

When I discuss how using negative language isn’t helpful for their child’s relationship with food, I often hear…

💬 “But I don’t say that in front of them.”
💬 “I never talk about good or bad foods to them.”
💬 “I give them access to all different types of food.”

These things are absolutely important and moving in the right direction! No doubt, these are positive shifts.

Yet, if you still hold a lot of judgment about food, and the food your child enjoys and eats, they’re going to feel it.

You likely make some comments without even noticing. You might make facial expressions you don’t realize. The choices you make about what to eat and what to provide are probably affected in some way. There are non-verbal messages they’re picking up on.

This doesn’t make you a bad parent or mean you’re ruining your child in some way. We all have our ‘stuff’. We ALL do!

And that’s why doing our own work around food and bodies is an essential element to cultivating a healthy relationship with food for our kiddos.

For more, grab my free guide: 5 Keys to Raise an Intuitive Eater at https://guides.nicolecruzrd.com/intuitiveeater

The language we use when talking about food and bodies is powerful. The messages we send to our kids become their intern...
02/14/2024

The language we use when talking about food and bodies is powerful.

The messages we send to our kids become their internal dialogue.

The things we say inform the way they eat and how they feel about food and themselves.

Overall, I think we need a little less judgment and a lot more love, trust, and compassion ❤️

For our kids to have a healthy relationship with sweets and be able to stop when they’ve had enough, we must create an o...
02/12/2024

For our kids to have a healthy relationship with sweets and be able to stop when they’ve had enough, we must create an overall neutral relationship with them.⁠

When we treat desserts like they’re something that have to be earned, or we limit them and say things like they shouldn’t have too much, we create a dynamic that actually makes our kids want them more.⁠

This doesn’t mean that you have to make them a free for all and have no boundaries or structure with them, but we do want to be thoughtful that we’re not limiting them ‘too much’ and that the language we use doesn’t make sweets feel bad or scarce.⁠

Instead, our kids need some structure with food but they also need to feel they have permission to have sweets and that they’re not going to be taken away.⁠

For more, grab my free sweets guide to help your child have a healthy relationship with sugar. Grab your FREE COPY at:
https://guides.nicolecruzrd.com/sweets

Do you want your child to have a healthy relationship with food? To be able to tune into their body cues and eat the amo...
02/09/2024

Do you want your child to have a healthy relationship with food? To be able to tune into their body cues and eat the amount they need?⁠

Then it’s so important to:⁠
Create a sense of food neutrality⁠
Allow them to eat the amount they want and stop when they’ve had enough⁠

When we’re talking about food neutrality, there’s often a misconception that foods are equal in nutrition. And that’s not at all the case!⁠

In its most simple form, what we mean by food neutrality is that foods are not judged based on their nutrient composition, and individuals are not judged based on what they eat.⁠

So when we tell our kids they need to eat a certain amount or type of food in order to eat a cookie (or any food) we’re automatically assigning some system of value on the food and telling our children they need to earn a cookie.⁠

At the same time, if what they really want is a cookie, we encourage them to eat past fullness just to get the thing they want, overriding their own internal cues.⁠

So instead of basing dessert on whether or not your child ate other food, decide ahead of time if you’re going to serve dessert or not.⁠

Then when it’s time for the meal, allow your child to have the cookie, ice cream, etc regardless of if they ate dinner.⁠

And if you’re not serving cookies that night, then they’re simply not on the menu. ⁠

For more tips on how to handle sweets, grab my free guide: My Kid Has a Sweet Tooth at
https://guides.nicolecruzrd.com/sweets

Let’s do a quick check in. How do you feel when your child eats sweets?Do you feel calm and trusting? Or potentially anx...
02/07/2024

Let’s do a quick check in.

How do you feel when your child eats sweets?

Do you feel calm and trusting? Or potentially anxious? Frustrated? Wanting to control it?

If you feel uncomfortable when your child grabs a second donut or asks for another piece of cake, you’re not alone.

As a culture, we tend to have A LOT of thoughts, feelings, and concerns about sugar.

We’re constantly told how toxic, horrible, and poisonous it is. How it’s the root of every health issue known to humankind.

We were likely brought up with this messaging and it continues to be perpetuated. We might even have our own ‘issues’ with sweets or be uncomfortable having them around.

And if we’re uncomfortable with sugar, for whatever reason, when we see our kids eating it, we might feel uneasy, anxious, frustrated, or tense. We might even want to step in and stop them from having sweets.

Regardless of whether we take action or not, our kids will pick up on our energy. They are so receptive.

I know it’s not always easy, but if we want our kids to have a healthy relationship with sugar and be able to stop when they’ve had enough, we have to work on regulating ourselves first.

The way we approach sugar is usually the opposite of how we help our children better regulate and have an overall health...
02/05/2024

The way we approach sugar is usually the opposite of how we help our children better regulate and have an overall healthy relationship with sweets.

I know sugar and sweets can feel concerning. We often worry about our kids being healthy overall: feeling good in their bodies, getting the nutrients they need, having good dental health…

And so we want to make sure they don’t have “too much”. I get it! I want my kids to be healthy and feel good too.

But here’s the thing!
The way we typically handle sweets is what ends up perpetuating the desire for them and our kids actually eating more sugar.
When they feel a sense of scarcity, it actually draws them toward it.

It’s normal human behavior… We want what we can’t have.

So our kids feel more drawn toward sweets but also feel guilty because they’ve been told that sugar is bad or unhealthy or they shouldn’t have too much.

However, when we focus on helping our children have a healthy relationship with sugar and sweets, they naturally balance out their intake instead of being preoccupied and obsessing over them.

And what’s just as important, if not more, is how they feel about sweets and themselves.

So many teens and adults I work with, tell me about the guilt and shame they experienced related to food and their body growing up, and it doesn’t go away.

Yes, eating a balanced diet is important, but having a healthy relationship with food informs the way we eat AND how we feel about ourselves.

To help your child have a healthy relationship with sugar, grab my free sweets guide! Comment here or DM me the word: Cupcake

Children tend to eat much different than what we’re conditioned to believe is ‘right’ or ‘healthy’.Maybe growing up you ...
02/02/2024

Children tend to eat much different than what we’re conditioned to believe is ‘right’ or ‘healthy’.

Maybe growing up you were taught about a ‘square meal’. Or maybe you were always told to eat your veggies to get dessert.

Or maybe at some point you learned to fill half your plate with veggies, and the other half with protein and carbs.

I’m not suggesting there’s something inherently wrong with eating a plate of veggies, meat, and grain, but it’s just that it’s not the only way a meal can look. And especially not if you’re eating intuitively.

And this is true for our children. They tend to eat a variety of nutrients over the course of the week, not at each individual meal or even over a day.

They might really be craving fruit and eat multiple servings at one meal or throughout the day but then not as much later in the week. This is not something we need to monitor closely or try to make sense of. It’s just something to know and allow to happen.

However, all too often, we don’t allow it to happen and we interfere with their natural ability to eat intuitively. We tell them to: eat their vegetables. Or we say: no more bread.

And we disrupt their internal cues. They tend to end up desiring the foods more they feel they’re not supposed to have (usually sweets and other carbs) and pushing away the ones they think they’re *supposed* to eat (usually veggies).

Our best bet is to provide our child with a variety of food (when possible) and allow them to decide what and how much to eat. Even more, we have to reprogram our ideas about what a meal SHOULD be.

Lastly, if you have concerns about what your child’s eating, you might make a loose food log and see if they’re hitting multiple food groups throughout the week.

For more on helping your child eat intuitively, grab my free guide: 5 Keys to Raise an Intuitive Eater.

Comment here or DM me: KEYS

I know it’s not the intention to create food and body shame, but sometimes the ways we parent with food inadvertently do...
01/31/2024

I know it’s not the intention to create food and body shame, but sometimes the ways we parent with food inadvertently do just that.

Think just for a second, what if someone told you, “you’ve had enough.”

How might that feel?

If you know you don’t want to encourage food and body shame, but aren’t sure how to help them eat healthy and balanced, grab my free guide: 5 Keys to Raise an Intuitive Eater

Comment here or DM me: KEYS

I know nutrition is important, but when it comes to how we approach feeding our kiddos, I don’t think it’s the number on...
01/29/2024

I know nutrition is important, but when it comes to how we approach feeding our kiddos, I don’t think it’s the number one priority. ⁠

And even when nutrition does become very important because there’s an ‘issue’, we still want to approach it through the lens of instilling food and body trust. ⁠

Instilling food and body trust in children is critical for their overall well-being and healthy development for several reasons, including:⁠

Healthy Relationship with Food: Teaching children to trust their bodies' hunger and fullness cues helps them develop a healthy relationship with food. It encourages them to eat intuitively rather than emotionally or compulsively.⁠
Prevention of Eating Disorders: Building trust around food and body image reduces the risk of developing eating disorders and disordered eating behaviors. ⁠
Positive Body Image: Promoting body trust fosters self-acceptance and confidence.⁠
Long-term Health: Developing intuitive eating habits promotes more balanced eating and better long-term physical health outcomes.⁠
Emotional Well-being: When children trust their bodies and feel comfortable with their food choices, they experience less stress and anxiety around eating, leading to better emotional well-being.⁠

If you want your child to not only eat a balanced variety but also to be a confident and Intuitive eater, grab my free guide: 5 Keys to Raise an Intuitive Eater. ⁠

DM me: KEYS to download it!

Do you trust your child when it comes to food? You know, how much they eat, or don’t eat? The types of food they choose?...
01/26/2024

Do you trust your child when it comes to food? You know, how much they eat, or don’t eat? The types of food they choose?⁠

Or do you worry that YOU need to get them to eat, stop them from eating too much, make them try something?⁠

If the second option is you - you’re normal!! As parents it’s so hard to watch our kids do things we don’t agree with or think is in their best interest. Right? We want them to be happy and healthy. We want them to feel good in their bodies. So it can be challenging to sit back and allow them to do things we disagree with or think are not in their best interest.⁠

And this is true with food too. If you feel like it’s your job to get your child to eat a certain way, I want to invite you to think about why… What are you trying to create, prevent, control? What are your fears if you allow them to navigate their food?⁠

Do you worry they’ll be unhealthy? Never like vegetables?⁠
Are you concerned about their body size? Do you know?⁠

If you’re not sure why you require bites or cut them off from eating, think about not doing that - what comes up for you? What’s your fear?⁠

As parents, our job is to make a variety of food available and then trust our child to eat the amount they want (or don’t want) from what we provide.⁠

And once we provide that food, our job is simply to trust them. To trust them to listen to their body, to make mistakes in eating and learn from them, and to grow into the body that’s right for them.⁠

When you feel the urge come up, to try and control something at the table, to get them to eat another bite or to cut them off from another piece of bread, try a new thought: I can trust my child to eat what they need.⁠

I know it might be scary. It might be taking a leap of faith. But instilling trust in them is the foundation they need for a lifetime of eating. ⁠

We won’t be there when they’re 20, 30, 40… telling them what to eat. They need to learn to trust themselves.⁠

To help your child have a lifetime of positive eating, grab my free guide 5 Steps to Raise an Intuitive Eater!⁠

Comment here or DM me KEYS to download it!

For more on helping your kiddo have a healthy relationship with sugar, comment here or DM the word CUPCAKE to download m...
01/24/2024

For more on helping your kiddo have a healthy relationship with sugar, comment here or DM the word CUPCAKE to download my free guide!

Our children’s relationship with food must come first!⁠⁠Applying ‘healthy eating’ strategies to an unhealthy relationshi...
01/22/2024

Our children’s relationship with food must come first!⁠

Applying ‘healthy eating’ strategies to an unhealthy relationship with food will always fall flat and create more unbalanced eating and potentially even deeper ‘issues’.⁠

We must lay a solid foundation, just like with anything in life. If you build a high rise with defective beams and then try to put beautiful office spaces and floor-to-ceiling windows, it will all crumble.⁠

Our children need a healthy relationship with food in order to eat a well nutritious diet in a balanced way.⁠

And the keys to a healthy relationship with food include how we talk about food, allowing them to listen to their body, and instilling food and body trust.⁠

For more, grab my free guide: 5 Keys to Raise an Intuitive Eater.⁠

Comment here or DM the word KEY to download it!

It makes sense if you want to help your child eat an amount you think they should.⁠⁠And I’m not suggesting there’s never...
01/19/2024

It makes sense if you want to help your child eat an amount you think they should.⁠

And I’m not suggesting there’s never a time to assess if your child is eating in a way that seems off. Maybe it appears they’re eating past fullness until physically ill, sneaking food, or you’ve noticed a sudden change in their behaviors with food.⁠

Of course, we don’t want to ignore signs that something may be up!⁠

However, jumping into automatically assuming your kiddo needs to eat less just because you think they ‘should’ doesn’t help.⁠

We have a lot of cultural messaging constantly telling us how much we should eat… portion sizes, servings, and types of food. But everyone’s body is different.⁠

That’s like saying that everyone who has a size 6 shoe should also be 5’2” tall. Some people might. And it might be a somewhat accurate idea to give us a range of what normal might be… but if someone who has a size 6 shoe is 5’5” does that mean they’ve done something wrong or we need to change their body?⁠

Of course not! ⁠

That’s just like how everyone has different appetites and metabolisms. And everyone needs different amounts of food.⁠

Who’s to say you know exactly how hungry or full your child is at any given moment? Who knows if they’re going through a growth spurt, have a fast metabolism, or simply have a big appetite?⁠

And only your child knows what it feels like to be in their body.⁠

So when you watch your child eat and it makes you uncomfortable, what’s most important is that you check in with yourself…⁠

👉What’s coming up for me?⁠
👉Who am I comparing my child to?⁠
👉What are my fears or concerns?⁠
👉What am I making this mean about my kiddo?⁠

Take a deep breath. Check in with yourself. And allow your child to eat the amount they need.⁠

Worried you can’t trust your kiddo to eat the amount they need? Grab my free guide- 5 Keys to Raise an Intuitive Eater!

Comment here or DM me the word: KEYS and I’ll send you the info to download it!

I feel this! As loving and aware parents, we want the best for our children. We want them to be happy and healthy. To fe...
01/17/2024

I feel this! As loving and aware parents, we want the best for our children. We want them to be happy and healthy. To feel good in their body. To be at a weight that will not cause them pain physically, mentally, or emotionally.⁠

We want them to easily participate in physical activities and to not be called out or made fun of because of their body size.⁠

None of us want our kids to hurt.⁠

We want to protect and support them.⁠

So it makes sense that we don’t want them to gain weight or be in a bigger body. Let's face it. Even though it's unjust, the culture we live in is not conducive to or accepting of larger bodies.⁠

The problem is when we parent with food from a place of fear, or wanting to control our child’s body size to help them feel good, it’s ineffective.⁠

1) It fails to promote a positive body image. We essentially tell our children: Your body is not ok the way it is. We need to control our bodies. Small is better. You can’t be trusted with food.⁠
2) It doesn't create the desired physical outcome, a smaller body. ⁠
Control in the feeding relationship is associated with accelerated weight gain, sneaking and hiding food, weight cycling later in life, feeling out of control with food, and binge eating.⁠

As parents, as hard as it is, we must detach the way we feed our children from their body size.⁠

If we want our children to be confident with food and in their bodies, we must relinquish any control over their size and shape and instead focus on our approach.⁠

It’s essential that we trust the process in order to cultivate trust in the feeding relationship and self-trust with food.⁠

Giving them appropriate control and access to a variety of foods will only help, not hinder, their relationship with food and their body.⁠

If you're unsure whether you're on the right track with giving them appropriate control and access to food, comment here or DM me TRACK. We’ll assess your family feeding dynamics together.

We were born free. Free of food and body shame.⁠⁠Hating our bodies. Not trusting ourselves with food. We learned this.⁠⁠...
01/15/2024

We were born free. Free of food and body shame.⁠

Hating our bodies. Not trusting ourselves with food. We learned this.⁠

I want to protect my child. All of our children. All of us.⁠

I’m not naive to believe weI can wrap our children in bubble wrap and truly protect them though. ⁠

It’s so ingrained in our culture.⁠

But I do know: I don’t want to contribute to it. ⁠

I’m going to actively choose to break the cycles of intergenerational food and body shame. If you’re ready to do the work too, comment here or DM me the word CYCLE and we’ll set up a time to chat!

Of course, nutrition is important… but it’s not the only thing! And sometimes our ways of focusing on nutrition actually...
01/12/2024

Of course, nutrition is important… but it’s not the only thing! And sometimes our ways of focusing on nutrition actually end up impacting our health negatively and our relationship with food.⁠

Our relationship with food is how we feel about food and ourselves for eating it.⁠

So when we’re so focused on eating “good” foods and cutting out the “bad” foods, or not eating certain food groups or macros, it informs how we eat.⁠

This might play out in different ways…⁠
If you really want a strawberry but you’re over your macros for the day to be able to eat one, you might pick cheese instead. But what if your body was really craving the fiber or vitamin C from the strawberry and it had actually already had enough protein? OR… maybe you were craving something a bit sweet, and when you don’t eat the strawberry you end up dissatisfied and bingeing on sweets.⁠

Maybe you tell yourself cookies are bad and off-limits. Then your friend stops by with cookies and you tell yourself not to eat them. Then they continue to stare at you, so you eat the whole batch to just get rid of them and move on so you don’t have to think about them anymore.⁠

You might go on a diet and eat “healthy”, lots of veggies and very low sugar (typical diet). Then you get so tired, hungry, and frustrated with the food so you stop dieting. And when you go off the plan all you want are sweets and “junk” you wouldn’t allow yourself and you don’t want to eat anything you were supposed to eat on the plan.

But if we weren’t so overly focused on getting in the perfect nutrients, we would likely do that naturally over time. We would eat the cookie when we felt like it and then move on and have the salad when we wanted it.

When we respond to our body cues we tend to eat in a balanced way. And we don’t have rebound and reactive eating after.

We need this for ourselves AND our children!

For more on Diet-free Family Nutrition, sign up for a free Eating Alignment Call at https://forms.gle/5nxGyFKxw11WnoNu8

I can’t wait for the first month of the new year to be over… gym ads, weight loss commercials, endcaps full of supplemen...
01/10/2024

I can’t wait for the first month of the new year to be over… gym ads, weight loss commercials, endcaps full of supplements and protein powder. Everyone talking about detoxing from the holidays… I’m exhausted already!

We put so much pressure on parents, and especially women, to do it all. We’re supposed to be a good partner, keep the ho...
01/08/2024

We put so much pressure on parents, and especially women, to do it all. We’re supposed to be a good partner, keep the house clean, raise good kids, and have a home cooked meal on the table every night.

Not only that, there’s some sort of elitism around shopping at Whole Foods, going to Farmer’s Markets, buying all organic, “healthy” products.

Somehow this determines whether we’re doing a good job parenting our children with food and therefore, whether we’re a good parent.

I have clients tell me again and again…
“I don’t feel like I’m doing enough.”
“It makes me feel like I’m not a good enough parent.”

So let’s stop and change the narrative. How much time you spend in the kitchen. Where you buy your groceries. The products you buy and feed your family, have nothing to do with your value as a human or how ‘good’ of a parent you are.

How is your relationship with food?⁠⁠So many of us want to help our children have a healthy relationship with food, but ...
01/05/2024

How is your relationship with food?⁠

So many of us want to help our children have a healthy relationship with food, but sometimes we forget about ourselves. Or we think it’s too late for us to change. Or that this info just doesn’t apply to us.⁠

And we stay stuck in our patterns with food. Feeling like we can’t keep certain foods in the house, or like we have to diet or limit our intake.⁠

Essentially, we don’t trust ourselves with food.⁠

If that’s the case for you, if you believe you need to control the types of food you eat or your portion sizes… If you believe you need to follow diets or programs to control your eating, then it sounds like you don’t trust yourself with food.⁠

While this is completely normal, because we live in a society that tells us we can’t be trusted around food, it also might be impacting how you feed your child.⁠

If you don’t trust yourself with food, it’s going to be a lot harder to trust your child.⁠

That might come out in the types of food you feed them, the language you use, or how you portion their food.⁠

You also might notice you feel anxious when you think they’re eating too much or too little or they take another cookie.

All of this is normal! AND the beauty of it is, when you work on your relationship with food, it often gets easier to feed your child.

AND when you focus on feeding your child to have a healthy relationship with food, it can also help you!!

Either way, you and your child deserve a healthy and mindful relationship with food!

Whether you could use support for yourself or feeding your family, we would love to chat. Link in my bio to schedule yours today at https://forms.gle/5nxGyFKxw11WnoNu8

Rejecting cultural standards about body size and claiming to embrace body diversity and be body positive… can’t only go ...
01/03/2024

Rejecting cultural standards about body size and claiming to embrace body diversity and be body positive… can’t only go up to a certain size. ⁠

I get it. Most all of us carry some inherent weight bias. It’s part of our culture. ⁠

We’re working through it. We’re learning, growing, and evolving. ⁠

AND we must be aware. ⁠

I recently saw a post where someone claimed to be ‘the most body positive person’ and then went on to suggest that being in a larger body means you’re not living your best life and truly taking care of yourself. ⁠

These two things cannot co-exist. ⁠

Body positivity and acceptance cannot cut off at some arbitrary size.

Happy New Year!!!Let’s choose to make 2024 the year we opt out of diet culture and food and body shame!Let’s make it the...
01/01/2024

Happy New Year!!!

Let’s choose to make 2024 the year we opt out of diet culture and food and body shame!

Let’s make it the year we honor our body, trust ourselves, and end the perpetual cycles.

Let’s do it together ❤️

Repeat after me… ❤️
12/29/2023

Repeat after me… ❤️

As we move into the new year, I want to encourage you to step back and take a look at any goals you set for yourself for...
12/28/2023

As we move into the new year, I want to encourage you to step back and take a look at any goals you set for yourself for this year.⁠

Here are some questions to consider:⁠
🤔Do they feel sustainable?⁠
🤔Are they flexible?⁠
🤔Do they bring me joy when I think about them?⁠
🤔Are they process oriented or results oriented?⁠
🤔Are they from a place of self-care?⁠
🤔Do they feel punishing?⁠
🤔How will they feel if I don’t do them?⁠
🤔Why are these on my list?⁠

I simply want to encourage you to take a deeper dive into your goal and intention setting?⁠

Notice how they make you feel and ask why they’re important to you?⁠

Do they feel gentle, respectful, kind, affirming, and loving.?⁠

Or harsh, rigid, and punishing?⁠

I hope you choose the things that light you up and make you feel good, not just after you do them, but while you’re doing them. 💛

If you are anything like me, when something feels a bit crazy, you might just want to jump in and try to fix it. And fix...
12/27/2023

If you are anything like me, when something feels a bit crazy, you might just want to jump in and try to fix it. And fix it right now!⁠

If I’ve been staring at messy rooms for days, or filtering endless food requests, I’m likely to finally “break” and not have my best parenting moments.⁠

With kids home from school and on break for the holidays, there’s likely less structure. And you might notice that with less structure, and potentially more or different food around, things feel chaotic and maybe a bit out of control.⁠

While that's normal, it's also not fun. And it’s typically not super helpful for parents or kids to feel like there's no structure and things are all over the place.⁠

So instead of doing what might be a natural reaction, like:⁠
saying no more sweets and getting rid of them all⁠
bribing - “if you want to cookie you have to eat your vegetables”⁠
dictating portions - “you have to finish your plate” or “you’re cut off after one”⁠

You might think about implementing structure that SUPPORTS your child, without overstepping and controlling what they eat.⁠

The structure is good for them to trust food is coming regularly and consistently and to know what to expect. It also gives you the boundaries without blaming it on them or the food, i.e. “you’ve had enough!”⁠

To learn more and implement a structure that works for you and your family, sign up for a free Eating Alignment Call at https://forms.gle/5nxGyFKxw11WnoNu8 today!

Happy Holidays my friend! ⁠⁠You’re doing the work. Enjoy today however you choose.⁠⁠Sending love, joy, and freedom from ...
12/25/2023

Happy Holidays my friend! ⁠

You’re doing the work. Enjoy today however you choose.⁠

Sending love, joy, and freedom from diet culture your way 💚❤️

“Did you eat all that? Oink oink. Little piggy.”I stood there frozen as I listened to these words spoken to my daughter....
12/21/2023

“Did you eat all that? Oink oink. Little piggy.”

I stood there frozen as I listened to these words spoken to my daughter.

What on earth is happening?

It was weird, said playfully. Yet it felt so horrible, disgusting, & wrong.

Because I know.

I know what words like these do.

They plant seeds for food & body shame, questioning, distrust…
Exactly what I don’t want for my daughter, boys, or any child for that matter.

And sadly, food & body comments are abundant, especially this time of year…

“Oh, they’re such a good eater!”
“You eat like a bird.”
“Finish your dinner if you want dessert.”
“What are you feeding this kid? He’s really filled out.”
“How do you afford to feed this kid? They’re gonna eat you out of house & home.”
"You better eat something or you're gonna waste away."

When someone comments like this, how should you, me, or any of us respond?

I suggest one or both of the following, depending on what’s being said & your comfort level.

Respond directly to the Unsolicited Comment Crusader.
Ignore them, & speak directly to your child.

1. To the Comment Crusader:
“Yep, she ate exactly what her body needed.”
“Let’s not talk about food or bodies. Thank you!”
“We trust our child to listen to their body and eat the amount they need.”
“We allow everyone in our family to eat food in the order they choose.”
“We’re fine with her not finishing. Thank you!”
“We all come in different shapes and sizes. That's what we find beautiful!”
“Let’s chat about something else.”

2. To your child:
“You don’t have to eat anything you don’t want. Just listen to your body.”
“You know you’re welcome to eat dessert if you choose. You can stop eating whenever you’re done.”
“No food is bad for us. Too much of anything might make your belly hurt. I trust you to listen to your body.”
“All bodies are good bodies. Your body is perfect just the way it is.”

I know it's hard sometimes! I feel it too.

*But it's important for all of us to remember: It's our job to protect & support our children with food & their body. NOT to make Grandma Nancy, Aunt Karen, or Cousin Sue comfortable.
Only YOU know what's best for your child, and it's ok to set boundaries with your family & friends as needed.

Our kids absorb EVERYTHING!They’re so receptive and learn from what we do and say.It starts with us!You’re a good parent...
12/20/2023

Our kids absorb EVERYTHING!
They’re so receptive and learn from what we do and say.

It starts with us!

You’re a good parent. And you also have your own history. If you struggle with your own relationship with food, you’re normal.
It’s intergenerational and you can break the cycle.

It’s never too late to heal… for yourself and your children 💛

If you’re ready to break the cycle, let’s connect. Sign up for a free call at https://calendly.com/nicolecruzrd today!

Address

Thousand Oaks, CA
91301

Opening Hours

Monday 9am - 5pm
Tuesday 9am - 5pm
Wednesday 9am - 6pm
Thursday 9am - 5pm

Telephone

(805) 341-9044

Alerts

Be the first to know and let us send you an email when Nicole Cruz RD posts news and promotions. Your email address will not be used for any other purpose, and you can unsubscribe at any time.

Contact The Business

Send a message to Nicole Cruz RD:

Videos

Share

Nearby clinics


Other Thousand Oaks clinics

Show All